Shot Darts

The Archer & the Dart Player
Phil Taylor has often commented that to be a good dart player you have to think of how an Archer fires an arrow.
What I believe he means by this is that aiming and target focus are very similar and aligning yourself with the target and keeping steady throughout then releasing smoothly etc etc.
In my opinion after you've got your grip and stance sorted and your eying the target the draw-back is the next critical factor. Get this wrong and your accuracy will suffer.
Going back to the archer and you'll see how steady and solidly he draws the bow whilst keeping the bow arm stationary.

   

Drawing back a dart must be viewed in a similar way i.e keeping the rest of your upper body rock steady and keeping the drawback straight and unwavering. This will have a large effect on your accuracy and consistency.

All theory no! Tonight I had a very solid practice at our club for over 2 1/2 hours in an effort to build up my stamina whilst recovering from a back injury.

As discussed above I concentrated on getting my drawback as straight as possible and as smooth a follow through and release as I could muster the results.....

I can honestly tell you in that time that I hit well over 30+ tons 20 odd 140's and 4 180's numerous scores over the 100 using the T19 & 18 etc my grouping was great and my rhythm improved greatly after a while it became second nature

Like Curly out of City Slickers said.....

   


That can hopefully improve your technique. Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Cheers
Dorian
Son of Merlin

Caerleon - Wales

(Mission "KURO" M4 rear taper design- 23GmYellow Kite Shape Flights 100 micron & Solid Brass Stems)

Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

My father Merlin, once told me that "You should end up pointing to what you were aiming at when you've released the Dart."




Reply
You're absolutely right. +1, sir. A straight drawback is a very big deal.

For the record, I also tried copying Taylor's eyebrow technique, and it didn't help me in the slightest. :-)
26's so far this year: I've already lost count. :-)

Reply
(10-29-2014, 01:56 PM)brenthahn Wrote: You're absolutely right. +1, sir. A straight drawback is a very big deal.

For the record, I also tried copying Taylor's eyebrow technique, and it didn't help me in the slightest. :-)

Thank you ...It really does work, just focus on getting a straight drawback then simply incorporate it into your action. After a good and steady workout it becomes second nature.... if you follow my meaning Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Cheers Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Dorian
Son of Merlin

Caerleon - Wales

(Mission "KURO" M4 rear taper design- 23GmYellow Kite Shape Flights 100 micron & Solid Brass Stems)

Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

My father Merlin, once told me that "You should end up pointing to what you were aiming at when you've released the Dart."




Reply


watched this earlier today , seems as go a place as any to post this
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply
I understand the principal behind it but the execution of it, i.e. keeping the dart in a straight line is near impossible for me lol
Subscribe to Darts Review Channel here: Darts Review Channel on Youtube

Click to visit Darts Review Channel website

My darts collection:
Flickr Album

Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply
I understand what you are talking about and agree with the majority of it (most all of it when talking about darts) but the draw back in archery doesn't have much affect on accuracy when shooting a bow. It's everything you do once the bow is drawn back that will affect how the arrow flies.

Like you have mentioned, a proper and consistent grip, stable and consistent anchor point (one of the most important things), keeping steady throughout then releasing smoothly with a proper follow through all contribute to being a good archer but drawing a bow back doesn't really affect it.

I shoot a bow probably more than I throw darts, both in 3D Target competitions and hunting wise (90% of my hunting is bow hunting). Its's a fantastic sport and for myself ranks right up there with darts.

Didn't mean to derail the thread but I couldn't help myself lol I wonder how often Phil shoots a bow Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply
(10-29-2014, 03:46 PM)jamie373 Wrote: [Video: https://youtu.be/_pk9pWikfMU]

watched this earlier today , seems as go a place as any to post this

Perfection!

Cheers Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Dorian
Son of Merlin

Caerleon - Wales

(Mission "KURO" M4 rear taper design- 23GmYellow Kite Shape Flights 100 micron & Solid Brass Stems)

Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

My father Merlin, once told me that "You should end up pointing to what you were aiming at when you've released the Dart."




Reply
(10-30-2014, 03:21 AM)Shanesaw Wrote: I understand what you are talking about and agree with the majority of it (most all of it when talking about darts) but the draw back in archery doesn't have much affect on accuracy when shooting a bow. It's everything you do once the bow is drawn back that will affect how the arrow flies.

Like you have mentioned, a proper and consistent grip, stable and consistent anchor point (one of the most important things), keeping steady throughout then releasing smoothly with a proper follow through all contribute to being a good archer but drawing a bow back doesn't really affect it.

I shoot a bow probably more than I throw darts, both in 3D Target competitions and hunting wise (90% of my hunting is bow hunting). Its's a fantastic sport and for myself ranks right up there with darts.

Didn't mean to derail the thread but I couldn't help myself lol I wonder how often Phil shoots a bow Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Not at all Shane thank you for your input, I appreciate it. In fact your darting / archery prowess may be a result of characteristics you've picked up from participating in both activities (just speculation of course)Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
What Im comparing is a similarity between drawing back your arm to release your dart and keeping it as staight and in line as possible for the follow through.
Naturally the archer has the bowstring but I'm suggesting that the care taken to keep rock solid and keeping the arrow and target within eyesight at all times ensures perfect alignment with the target. Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.:

What I believe Phil Taylor was getting at is that the 'ready steady aim fire ' approach has some commonality with archery. I think that if you imagine you have a bowstring in your hand when drawing back your arm it will give you better accuracy (it certainly does for my throwing style). Importantly though, this approach has more in common with his particular action than many others and would have little meaning to say MVG's technique.


Cheers
Dorian
Son of Merlin

Caerleon - Wales

(Mission "KURO" M4 rear taper design- 23GmYellow Kite Shape Flights 100 micron & Solid Brass Stems)

Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

My father Merlin, once told me that "You should end up pointing to what you were aiming at when you've released the Dart."




Reply
(10-30-2014, 03:21 AM)Shanesaw Wrote: I understand what you are talking about and agree with the majority of it (most all of it when talking about darts) but the draw back in archery doesn't have much affect on accuracy when shooting a bow. It's everything you do once the bow is drawn back that will affect how the arrow flies.

I need to disagree with you here. While everything at full draw has a huge impact to your accuracy, how you draw back does impact it as well. It can be very important to maintaining proper form, getting shoulders placed properly, etc. It is all part of the shot sequence, and all needs to be the same and committed to muscle memory.

Now, the illustrations were for finger shooting, so maybe that is a bit more like dart throwing, however in compound, release archery shooting, there are a ton of anchor points that you have that help you know when you are at the correct position to actually release an arrow. I'd be very interested in if there was anything similar for darts.

For instance, my compounds have a draw stop, it comes back the same amount every time, no draw stop on my arm. I also have 3 anchor points to know I'm aligned properly so that I can aim properly with my sight. I have the knuckles on my release hand on the corner of my jaw, the tip of my nose to the string, and a knot of rope material on the string that sits in the corner of my mouth.

Then I need to make sure my peep sight is aligned to the rings on my scope.

Lots and lots of indicators, or crutches if you will to get you in proper position to let an arrow go. I'd love to learn some for throwing darts.
Reply
Been an archer for a while both 3D and hunting. If you have all your anchors set up in archery a kid can do it, not in any way dissing archery I LOVE IT! These are just two different skill sets in my opinion. I could Robin Hood arrow purposefully much easier than darts! I believe you can use the alignment, stance and target aquisition as comparisons and that’s about it. Some people sky draw a bow, some ground draw, some horizontal draw. You don't see that many variations in GOOD dart shooters or at least I don’t.
I believe archery is easier and MORE expensive!!! By far! I have thought about breaking my bow out when I get frustrated with my DARTS....

Azle
Reply
Gentlemen thanks for you interest...much appreciated Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images....I'm wondering if there are any clips of the archery you're involved with that we could all view. Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Not forgetting of course Shane Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Thanks Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.


Cheers
Dorian
Son of Merlin

Caerleon - Wales

(Mission "KURO" M4 rear taper design- 23GmYellow Kite Shape Flights 100 micron & Solid Brass Stems)

Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

My father Merlin, once told me that "You should end up pointing to what you were aiming at when you've released the Dart."




Reply
I personally don't have any video of me shooting. It would probably help me point out form flaws though.

However, more to the point of the OP, if my drawing elbow isn't in straight alignment with the arrow, then that will result in a poor shot. I'm often purposely trying to pull my elbow behind my head to ensure proper alignment. This goes straight into follow through as well. When the shot breaks, I want my draw arm to come straight back with a good follow through. With darts coming straight back and then back forward on the same path would also facilitate a good follow through.
Reply
(11-01-2014, 04:54 AM)ThunderEagle Wrote: I personally don't have any video of me shooting. It would probably help me point out form flaws though.

However, more to the point of the OP, if my drawing elbow isn't in straight alignment with the arrow, then that will result in a poor shot. I'm often purposely trying to pull my elbow behind my head to ensure proper alignment. This goes straight into follow through as well. When the shot breaks, I want my draw arm to come straight back with a good follow through. With darts coming straight back and then back forward on the same path would also facilitate a good follow through.

What you have stated means that you have good form while shooting but I do stand by my opinion on my draw back having very little to do with my arrow flight. As azle stated some people draw different, some sky draw a bow, some ground draw, some horizontal draw. It's once I'm drawn back making sure that my form is stable and proper that makes a difference. Like I said in my first post about proper form, anchor points, follow through, etc being the most important aspects with the draw itself having very little to do with it.

I have hunted in some very rough terrain and strange shooting positions and have had to draw awkwardly at times for it to go unnoticed by the game but as long as I settle in and focus on those keys points my accuracy doesn't suffer at all.

Again just my opinion Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply
(11-01-2014, 05:15 AM)Shanesaw Wrote: I have hunted in some very rough terrain and strange shooting positions and have had to draw awkwardly at times for it to go unnoticed by the game but as long as I settle in and focus on those keys points my accuracy doesn't suffer at all.

Well, there is big game hunting accuracy, and then Vegas target face accuracy. One is hitting a paper plate, one is hitting a dime.

In general I think we are in agreement, but there are things you can do before and during the draw cycle that makes it easier to establish proper form at anchor, doesn't mean you can't adjust once you get to full draw, so for some, it may not matter, especially in a hunting or 3d scenario where there are limited shots. Hunting I may be standing, I may be sitting, and that requires all kinds of weird drawing motions.
Reply
Another interesting post.
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)
Darts Clearance.