Which dart weight to choose? Heavy or light?
It's weird but I started with 24g and went down to 23g then 22g. Moved back to 24g and have kept moving up the weights.

I now throw 30g and am playing better than ever. I just don't feel in control with lighter darts now for some reason.
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I still believe the importance of weight is all relative. In a similar premise to the boiling frog parable - you start at 26g and work your way down step by step to 10g, and they feel as natural as 26g if you went in the other direction.
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Has anyone found much of a difference changing from 24g to 22g? I throw 24 atm and have been the last few years, considering giving 22 a rattle to see how they go.  Smile
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I went from 24 to 22 similar barrels, normally throw John Lowe Hero & went to 22g Harrows Atomic. U can or I can notice the difference but I would say I more consistent with the 24's but when I'm on it with the 22 I'm on a different level. I say get similar shaped barrels & occasionally u might throw better with the lighter but u can change back. Ady Lewis switches from 21 to 23 occasionally just how u feel at that period of your throwing
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I threw 25gram darts for nearly 20 years, and only in the last couple of years I dropped down to 24 to try out a new dart.  I've kept all my 25gram darts and I now find them too heavy.   Big Grin
Scotty Burnett 24 Ambassador series vs3
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Nearly all darts with a reasonable design will fly well and true if they are released properly.
A few years ago, when I was practising for a couple of hours daily, I really went to town with tweaking.
I am not a pro (for whom I imagine that subtle changes make a big difference) but this is what I did.

I tried different weight barrels, different shaft lengths, different flights, cutting up flights to different shapes and to make them smaller, etc., all to find out what differences were made.
I designed a barrel and had a set made for me once I had some data.  These darts fly really well and are 23g including points.
I even made some darts out of rolled up newspaper.  These weigh in at less than 2 grams; I held them together with sellotape and just stuck points in them.  They fly fine.
By far the biggest difference in all cases was shaft length and flight diameter.
If you have a light darts, a smaller flight is "usually" better as there is less drag which offsets the need to throw a light dart harder / faster.
Similarly, if you have a short stem, a bigger flight is "usually" better as it helps slow the dart in flight.

On to barrel shape; this only produced a subtle difference *for my throw*.  I have the dart resting on my thumb with the three finger grip.
I tried front, rear and even weighted darts; in the end I just settled on a shape that was most comfotable because the difference was so small compared to the shart / flight combination.

Weight: if you have a good, solid, repeatable throw then this has the least effect.
As I said, I settled on 25g darts and I will explain why soon.

Incidentally, at the time I ended up with extra short stems (27mm) and Dimplex flights on a 25g even weighted barrel.
The Dimplex flight has a greater drag effect meaning that a huge flight is not required.

I went with the heavier dart because of inertia; quite simply, lighter darts deflect more in close grouping when they hit each other.

Here are some photo's of the difference the different setups made (I have scored 180's with all these darts but that was years ago and I am just starting to get back into the game after a three year break).
https://mikeymoore.co.uk/differentDarts.html
Disclaimer: You might notice that I am quite opinionated.
Please take what I write and think about it and do not just assume that it is true.
My truth might not be your truth and my truth might be wrong anyway!
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Welcome to Dartsnutz FirstMM . Thanks for the informative initial post .
 

******************************************
Match Darts=Target Darryl Fitton,s® 22g

Back ups= Hmmmmm??? ®

 And..A few sets of spares .®   Rolleyes
Cheers,
 Ken 
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Thanks Ken,

Also nice to see good use of the G chord in your avatar Smile

Mikey
Disclaimer: You might notice that I am quite opinionated.
Please take what I write and think about it and do not just assume that it is true.
My truth might not be your truth and my truth might be wrong anyway!
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My theory on this is that each player has a range of weights that they can throw well.

I went through a pretty long process years ago where I experimented with different weights. I'd give myself several hours to get used to a different set / weight and then keep stats over several hours of play.

When I plotted 3 dart average against dart weight I got something like a bell curve. I had an optimal weight range between about 21 and 23g. There was a slight drop in for as I moved out of that range which increased more noticeably as I moved towards much heavier or lighter darts.

My point is that most people can probably play well within a range of weights if they have time to adjust.

There doesn't seem to be any logic as to what weights suit people best. Being short or tall, strong or weak doesn't seem to show any trends.

From my perspective, I don't get too hung up on weight as long as it's within my range.
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I like the idea of plotting accuracy against dart weight, I wish I had thought of that!
I am going to give it a go. What I found before was that my darts, on any weight, even the <2g newspaper darts, just flew the same once I had set up the correct stem / flight combo for me throw. Marking against accuracy is clearly the next logical step.
Disclaimer: You might notice that I am quite opinionated.
Please take what I write and think about it and do not just assume that it is true.
My truth might not be your truth and my truth might be wrong anyway!
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I did a long-ish term experiment at the end of last season where I went from 23g to 25g of the same dart with the same length, same setup same everything, only the diameter of the dart.  I used 60 darts @T20 for each set over 4 separate sessions, once at the beginning and once at the end of each session over the course of a couple of weeks.  I then did the same for a set of darts where I went from 24g to 20g almost instantaneously, again where only the diameter of the dart changed.

I have been sitting on the data since about May and should actually write the whole thing up and post it here. Crunching my #s, I saw absolutely no discernible difference for me when I changed dart weight but kept everything else the same.  Changes in barrel balance or stem length, now you're talking BIG differences.
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Wongerchi, this sounds like a sign of a well established and practised throw!

As an aside, it is worth bearing in mind that a 3mm (1/8th inch) deviation at 20 inches (arm length) will amplify to 14mm (half inch) at the dart board.
This is why it is so important to keep the same stance and position and to only move the bits that need moving (i.e. arm, shoulder and wrist in varying degree's).
It is so easy to blame the dart when really it is the mechanics of the throw that are at fault.
I would think that changing the dart when the throw is inconsistent is more likely to hinder progress than correct it, unless you get lucky of course!

This begs the question, do you change your dart to match your natural throw or modify your throw to match the dart?
Surely there needs to be something consistent in order to get consistent results?
Disclaimer: You might notice that I am quite opinionated.
Please take what I write and think about it and do not just assume that it is true.
My truth might not be your truth and my truth might be wrong anyway!
Reply
(09-08-2017, 10:34 PM)FirstMM Wrote: This begs the question, do you change your dart to match your natural throw or modify your throw to match the dart?
Surely there needs to be something consistent in order to get consistent results?

I'm assuming this is a rhetorical question, but if not then the answer is, of course, the former.  Change the setup of the dart to match your natural throw.  How you figure out what to change, and then how to change it, is another kettle of fish.

On another note, I've seen that statement (3mm at the arm = 14mm at the board) a lot but I've never been able to work out the math behind it, could someone supply me with an idiots guide? Rolleyes
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Sure thing on the idiots guide Smile tbh I didn't know it was a "known" statistic.

Basically, the distance from your shoulder to the release point is approximately 20" and the distance from your shoulder to the board is approximately 93" (7 feet times twelve plus 9 inches).
93" divided by 20" is 4.65 which means that there are 4.65 lots of that 20" from shoulder to release point until the board is reached.
3mm times 4.65 is 13.95mm which is near enough 14mm.

If you stand on the oche and point at the bullseye and them move your finger until it points at the edge of the dart board, notice how little your finger moves compared to the distance at the the board.
Disclaimer: You might notice that I am quite opinionated.
Please take what I write and think about it and do not just assume that it is true.
My truth might not be your truth and my truth might be wrong anyway!
Reply
(09-09-2017, 05:23 PM)FirstMM Wrote: Sure thing on the idiots guide Smile  tbh I didn't know it was a "known" statistic.

Basically, the distance from your shoulder to the release point is approximately 20" and the distance from your shoulder to the board is approximately 93" (7 feet times twelve plus 9 inches).
93" divided by 20" is 4.65 which means that there are 4.65 lots of that 20" from shoulder to release point until the board is reached.
3mm times 4.65 is 13.95mm which is near enough 14mm.

If you stand on the oche and point at the bullseye and them move your finger until it points at the edge of the dart board, notice how little your finger moves compared to the distance at the the board.

Thanks!  I was wondering if I was missing anything in the actual #s.

I have a problem with the logic though.  All things being equal, if  your hand moves up 3mm, then your release point moves up 3mm, and assuming your release is consistent (as you have to with simple math) then you miss high by 3mm, because the dart describes the same parabola to the board, just 3mm higher than before..  I'm sure there is something else I'm missing here.

This is totally derailing the thread but it goes back to just how hard it is to isolate changes in dart weight while keeping everything else the same.  I got lucky when I did my experiment as the darts I was using had the same balance/grip/length.  If I'd tried this experiment with, say, the Target Taylor 9Fives (which use drill-out to change weight between 22 and 24g) I'd have seen a completely different result.
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