Harrows Darts.

Help with recent decline in darts
Normally feel good and comfortable throwing darts but the past couple of months have been horrible, throwing snatchy darts and just uncomfortable gripping the dart, and release is all over the place. Changing weights, grip, throw, everything to try and get comfortable again and nothing seems to be helping.

Any idea how to try and get back to being happy and comfortable with darts again? 

Thanks
Started playing: June 2017

Can’t help but buying darts and selling them and using the same old ones I’ve used since I started
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Goat sacrifice to Mesopotamian Deathgod, Nergal. ---

Maybe you are overthinking - all your mental focus is on your dart - your grip - your throwing action, weight balance on your feet... The more active your head is the more it will doubt itself. Vicious circle if you are thinking negative thoughts.

I'd be tempted to trick your own head - focus your mind with something else... maybe an audio book or some other mental distraction. - Leave your brain on autopilot just throwing at the target - using some focus but unable to overthink it, as your active brain is occupied picturing the plot of the audio books descriptions you should be less anxious and more smooth and relaxed.

Then you may find your consistency has returned and your confidence back with a vengeance. If that doesn't work... you may need a goat after all.
Ryk is currently using:-

 
Arrows - 16g Harrows Girls Lolita (Reflex Conversion C type):: Stems Edgeglow Purple Short :: Flights Rie Hoshino Marathon :: - Winmau Blade 6
::

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Like Ryk said, first try a goat sacrifice.  If it's bad enough you may want to jump straight to the cow sacrifice or really just do both to be safe.  

But when that doesn't work, lock your darts away for 2 or 3 days.  I was just having a brush with God awful form.  Was tempted to change everything possible and just start from scratch.  Instead, just ended up taking 3 days away from the board to reset the brain and the body and it all came back to me.

Game is 90% mental.  The other 10% is fighting with the demons in your head.  Sounds like you're losing the mental fight, just like I was.  Time for a rest and reset!
Current Match Setup

26g Designa Razor Grip V2 Double Grip 
Harrows Supergrip Fusion X steams in betweens
Harrows Vivid Standard flights
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As a player who has been addicted to changing and chopping, I would advise picking the one set that works the best and stay with it. 

After buying a new set at least once a month for quite a while, I cleaned house. I shot pretty well with the ones I stuck with.

Also, sometimes a break doesn't hurt either. So maybe stop practicing too much. Take a breather.

That's what I have been doing at the moment and my game came back. Hope it helps and good luck!!!
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Take a week off.

Darts progression is very much 2 steps forward, one step back. I’ve learned to speed up my progression by taking time off when I had two bad sessions in a row. This way the bad habits didn’t have chance to become permanent.

Darts is addictive so taking a week off can be tough for some. It gives your body chance to fully rest and recover and more importantly your mind chance to rest and recover. I find I come back really eager to play darts and love the game again.

Which reminds me...I’ve not had a week off in a while so I could join you. Give you a hand with that goat if you want?
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These days I'm just not throwing with as much focus either. My suspicion is that life has got way too much in my face.
If you can just realize that the game will not change and that you can throw as good or better than you are now makes it happen easier than you might expect. For me it's a way to relax. If I'm not relaxed then I do not throw. Pretty much my philosophy in life. No fun, change direction.
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I've been in a prolonged slump since spring when I was fighting tendonitis in my throwing elbow. I had to take a couple months off and now I can't seem to get my throw back. Let me know how that goat works out.
Liberal heathen
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The big one for me when I go through a period where I feel incapable of throwing straight darts is to go back to Flight School A1.  (The reality is that, for me, this need to be a permanent fixture in my practice routine.)

There's plenty of info on here about what the drill is but a recap:
  • Throw three darts at big 20.  If you hit it with at least two darts you get a mark.  If you hit it with 1 or zero darts, no mark.
  • Work through the big numbers (i.e. the segment between the treble and the double) for 20 - 13 inclusive.
  • Once you have 5 marks on a number, that number is done
  • Continue until you have 5 marks for each number between 20 and 13
  • Don't record how long it takes in terms of time or rounds
I thought this drill was trivial and a bit of a waste of time when I first encountered it - I mean, hitting the big numbers isn't hard. But that's the point! This drill is specifically designed to have you throwing at the biggest target with the minimum of pressure. It's not in any way mimicking a "real" scenario and nor should it be.

For me this drill works so well because it gives me the space to throw well. It doesn't matter if I miss if I am throwing well during this drill. This mindset does mean that by the end of the drill I do feel like I'm throwing good darts so when I transition to something with more pressure, my throw tends to hold up.

This is a drill that you have to get to get the most from. It's about giving you enough of a target to focus your throw without applying any pressure which will impact your ability to execute.  The idea is that you groove your throw here and when it's solid, up the pressure to see if it holds up.

Some recent context
The last two weeks in the league we have played the bottom two teams, with my team sat in third.  I somehow managed to win 4 from 7 singles games but only by sheer bloody-mindedness and refusing to give up even when miles behind in legs and throwing a steady stream of 45's.  Despite getting some wins for the team I was having no fun whatsoever and not rally looking forward to turning up.

After I stopped feeling sorry for myself I dusted off my old practice routines, starting with A1.  The first few rounds I was throwing the same rubbish as in the league but there's something zen-like about this drill that gives me space to find my throw.  By the end of the drill I felt like I was throwing well again, and enjoying that simple pleasure of a well-thrown dart hitting what you aim for.

Friday night was a big practice session, starting with A1. This time I felt good at the start and was getting the old feel back.  The drills I through after finishing A1 were up there with being about as well as I can throw.

Darts is obviously a game that has a large mental aspect and A1, for me, is the drill that gets me straightened out.

Darts: Harrows Glen Durrant Duzza Series 2 24g, short Harrows Supergrip shafts, Harrows flights (Marathon/Retina/Optix/Rapide) 


Best 501: 13 darts (League), 14 darts (Pro Darter)

Best Checkout: 154 (League), 160 (Pro Darter)
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(05-02-2021, 02:08 AM)Banz Wrote: The big one for me when I go through a period where I feel incapable of throwing straight darts is to go back to Flight School A1.  (The reality is that, for me, this need to be a permanent fixture in my practice routine.)

There's plenty of info on here about what the drill is but a recap:
  • Throw three darts at big 20.  If you hit it with at least two darts you get a mark.  If you hit it with 1 or zero darts, no mark.
  • Work through the big numbers (i.e. the segment between the treble and the double) for 20 - 13 inclusive.
  • Once you have 5 marks on a number, that number is done
  • Continue until you have 5 marks for each number between 20 and 13
  • Don't record how long it takes in terms of time or rounds
I thought this drill was trivial and a bit of a waste of time when I first encountered it - I mean, hitting the big numbers isn't hard. But that's the point! This drill is specifically designed to have you throwing at the biggest target with the minimum of pressure. It's not in any way mimicking a "real" scenario and nor should it be.

For me this drill works so well because it gives me the space to throw well. It doesn't matter if I miss if I am throwing well during this drill. This mindset does mean that by the end of the drill I do feel like I'm throwing good darts so when I transition to something with more pressure, my throw tends to hold up.

This is a drill that you have to get to get the most from. It's about giving you enough of a target to focus your throw without applying any pressure which will impact your ability to execute.  The idea is that you groove your throw here and when it's solid, up the pressure to see if it holds up.

Some recent context
The last two weeks in the league we have played the bottom two teams, with my team sat in third.  I somehow managed to win 4 from 7 singles games but only by sheer bloody-mindedness and refusing to give up even when miles behind in legs and throwing a steady stream of 45's.  Despite getting some wins for the team I was having no fun whatsoever and not rally looking forward to turning up.

After I stopped feeling sorry for myself I dusted off my old practice routines, starting with A1.  The first few rounds I was throwing the same rubbish as in the league but there's something zen-like about this drill that gives me space to find my throw.  By the end of the drill I felt like I was throwing well again, and enjoying that simple pleasure of a well-thrown dart hitting what you aim for.

Friday night was a big practice session, starting with A1. This time I felt good at the start and was getting the old feel back.  The drills I through after finishing A1 were up there with being about as well as I can throw.

Darts is obviously a game that has a large mental aspect and A1, for me, is the drill that gets me straightened out.

Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images. +1
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

B: 22g   S: Medium   F: No. 6   180s: 2/13
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(05-02-2021, 02:08 AM)Banz Wrote: The big one for me when I go through a period where I feel incapable of throwing straight darts is to go back to Flight School A1.  (The reality is that, for me, this need to be a permanent fixture in my practice routine.)

There's plenty of info on here about what the drill is but a recap:
  • Throw three darts at big 20.  If you hit it with at least two darts you get a mark.  If you hit it with 1 or zero darts, no mark.
  • Work through the big numbers (i.e. the segment between the treble and the double) for 20 - 13 inclusive.
  • Once you have 5 marks on a number, that number is done
  • Continue until you have 5 marks for each number between 20 and 13
  • Don't record how long it takes in terms of time or rounds
I thought this drill was trivial and a bit of a waste of time when I first encountered it - I mean, hitting the big numbers isn't hard. But that's the point! This drill is specifically designed to have you throwing at the biggest target with the minimum of pressure. It's not in any way mimicking a "real" scenario and nor should it be.

For me this drill works so well because it gives me the space to throw well. It doesn't matter if I miss if I am throwing well during this drill. This mindset does mean that by the end of the drill I do feel like I'm throwing good darts so when I transition to something with more pressure, my throw tends to hold up.

This is a drill that you have to get to get the most from. It's about giving you enough of a target to focus your throw without applying any pressure which will impact your ability to execute.  The idea is that you groove your throw here and when it's solid, up the pressure to see if it holds up.

Some recent context
The last two weeks in the league we have played the bottom two teams, with my team sat in third.  I somehow managed to win 4 from 7 singles games but only by sheer bloody-mindedness and refusing to give up even when miles behind in legs and throwing a steady stream of 45's.  Despite getting some wins for the team I was having no fun whatsoever and not rally looking forward to turning up.

After I stopped feeling sorry for myself I dusted off my old practice routines, starting with A1.  The first few rounds I was throwing the same rubbish as in the league but there's something zen-like about this drill that gives me space to find my throw.  By the end of the drill I felt like I was throwing well again, and enjoying that simple pleasure of a well-thrown dart hitting what you aim for.

Friday night was a big practice session, starting with A1. This time I felt good at the start and was getting the old feel back.  The drills I through after finishing A1 were up there with being about as well as I can throw.

Darts is obviously a game that has a large mental aspect and A1, for me, is the drill that gets me straightened out.

I agree A1 is an awesome drill.  I am curious what happened to the Flight School posts on this forum, there used to be a section for it?
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Coming a bit from the golf perspective, your play level began to fall, you payed more attention to mechanics thinking there was a breakdown there to blame and now, unknowingly, you’re stuck there. Darts is not only mental it is almost entirely intuitive. Humans have been throwing or shooting things at other things for millennia. George Silberzahn, when I asked him about a similar issue, encouraged me to take all my darts of all weights and lengths and flights and just throw them at the board. Not focusing on a small target or the dart or throw mechanics. Just do it. I added an extra thought from golf instruction and Tim Galwey’s “Inner Game” techniques. You focus conscious thought on something that is less relevant than the mechanics. As you throw try to mark the end of your drawback saying “back,” then”fly” at release and “stick” when the dart hits the board. I think it will help with your rhythm, flow and you should find your accuracy improves as your timing of the marks improve.
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stop. practicing bad form reinforces bad form. practice good form until it starts to go sideways and stop. reinforce the good form over the bad form and you will make progress. even if it's 10 mins of good form a day, that's so much better than 1 hour of bad form.
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(04-30-2021, 11:14 AM)Kaigen Moore Wrote: Changing weights, grip, throw, everything to try and get comfortable again and nothing seems to be helping.
I'm not surprised. The psychological aspects of your dart playing should be considered before the physical. The last thing you want to do is to be changing grip and throw if it's worked before. If it worked before then there's obviously nothing wrong in that department. Changing the above is just going to put you in a real pickle. 'Invisible' factors such as mood, tiredness, frustration/relaxation, and so on are what should be looked at first.

As Ryk quite correctly points out, the goat sacrifice is the cure-all. Take it from there.
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Time off from throwing would be the logical answer... this works for me.

You are basically doing a reset which can benefit some players.

Darts - Unknown - 31mm barrel  --  Dart Weight - 21.9g throwing
Darts - Unicorn Dum Dum - 24.5mm barrel  --  Dart Weight - 16.9g throwing
Stems - Shanghai Satin Nylon 34mm  --  Flights - Designa Mini
Board - One80 Gladiator II  --  Light - Homemade LED Dimmer Ring
180's - Lost count  Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.   --  Highest Shot out - 170
Best sequence thrown - 9 Perfect Darts in practice

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