Harrows Darts.

Beginner finding the right dart.
I was wondering if you could let me know your thoughts on how you would go about finding a suitable dart as a beginner?

I have been experimenting with different weights, grips, barrel shape and lengths and can pretty much throw them all with similar consistency. I have only been taking things seriously for about the last 6 months and have noticed that I still don’t feel hugely confident with any of my darts. I seem to be a consistent 40 average player with any set of darts I pick up.

Would anyone say that they found a set of darts that just felt better than the rest. Or maybe things just click one day. I’d love to just pick a set and stick to them so that I can really start to get a feel for them.

I think half my problem is I actually like the look of so many darts that I just want to buy most sets I see. I’m up to 10 sets already and have stems of all lengths and colours.

Any advice or guidance would be great.


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If you have 10 sets the chances are you already have a few suitable sets. If you’re averaging 40 with all of the sets I suggest a little more practice is needed as a new set of darts won’t magically make you a better player. I understand what you’re e saying though as I have about 15 sets, mostly straight barrelled though, and I still throw them all with similar success/failure.
Darts:One80 R2 rebel, harrows atomic or designa dark thunder 24g
Stems: harrows supergrip 
Flights: harrows marathon/dimplex
Board: blade 5 DC
Lighting: unicorn solar flare
Highest out:158
Best leg: 12
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A set of darts won’t make you better. Having confidence in the set of darts you’re throwing will make you play better though. Confidence is gained by consistency, consistency is gained by throwing the same set up.

IMO weight really doesn’t make a difference. 15g - 50g, you will get used to that weight really quickly, especially as a newer player. So don’t worry about a darts weight so much. Experiment with different weights if you can. Really light, standard 21-25g and then really heavy. You will prefer a certain weight range. Once you find that out stick with it.

Barrel profile again IMO doesn’t make any difference. The shape of a barrel doesn’t matter as long as the part where you grip has the correct grip and width.

A dart should be picked based on your grip. Don’t ever grip based on the dart. Keep your grip consistent regardless of what you’re throwing. I base my grip on the distance from the nose of the dart. My thumb and index finger are in contact with the dart at 25-40mm from the end of the darts nose. Therefore I look for darts with grip at the 25-40mm section of the dart.

Type of grip takes some experimenting. I’ve gotten used to high level grips so this is the style I look for. Basic ring grips don’t work any more. I could get used to them again over time, but throwing with very grippy darts has ironed out my throw and release I think and made me have a better throw. Hopefully your 10 sets of darts has a variety of grips. Try them all again and hopefully one should feel like you’re accelerating the dart on release. That’s when you know the grip level is correct.

Balance point is the second most important thing to me. It doesn’t have to be perfect but it has to be close. I can alter the balance point somewhat with stems, flights and points. I prefer the balance point to be at 25mm from the nose of the barrel so I grip just behind it. Look for a balance point as close to your grip as you can. 

That leads me onto barrel length...46mm is my preferred choice. This is because straight barrel darts will usually have a balance point close to the middle, maybe a bit to the front at around 21mm. Add on my stems and flights then the balance point is where I like it. If I throw with a barrel length longer than 48mm then my darts hand tail down. If I throw with barrels shorter than 40mm and I grip the shaft which I hate. Throw all your darts and the ones that land at your preferred angle should be the length you want. 

Moral of the story is to find this information out like I have done. Only way to do this is to buy lots of darts! I was up to 20+ sets before I settled on what I liked. No set I bought was similar. Now every set I buy and have made are very similar.

Once you find out what specs you need head onto DC and use their dart selector. 

On a final note...the biggest thing for me was settling on a set of darts, stem length and flight. Then I stuck with it.
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Thank you guys. As always this is valuable information and I found myself reading most of that and thinking some things are making a lot of sense.

Like a lot of us I started off by using a set of cheap brass darts that came with the board. These are 22g, quite thick and offer very little grip. When I bought my first set of tungsten darts I bought some cheap Red Dragon Rebels which are 21g and have quite an aggressive grip. I couldn’t get used to the grip though I did feel the thinner barrels were a lot more accurate than the brass bombs. It felt like the rings grip was snagging on my index finger sometimes as I was releasing the dart.

I have since bought more sets of darts ranging in grip levels and barrel lengths. Most are straight barrel types which I just assumed was a good place to start.

There are definitely some sets of darts that feel better than others. It’s probably more of a case that it’s easier to say which ones give me no confidence at all. And actually, the 3 sets of darts I’d say I’ve had the best results with have all been shorter barrels. These are the 21g Rebels at 48mm, the 20g Jelle Klaasen Unicorns at 45.7mm, and the 16g Unicorn Golden Hero soft tip barrels that I used conversion points in, which are about 40mm. These shorter barrels sit best in the board for me and I also have tail down issues with the longer, thinner, straight barrels.

I’ll go through my sets again, allowing several days per set to give them all a proper chance, and run through my usual routines and matches to see what feels best. Thanks again for the advice.


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For me to hold a dart that I like the looks of and feels well balanced makes me want to use it more. But, I have too many darts in boxes that I liked the looks of but they didn't feel good to throw. So deciding on where you like to grip the dart is very important before you start getting darts you think you might like to throw. After I decided I like rear grip it made a huge difference in what I even looked into purchasing.
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Something evenly weighted (not front or rear weighted), 23-24g, full length grip, 80% or higher tungsten, and 45-51mm long. Something like a red dragon razor edge, rebel, fury, pegasus, or similar would be excellent choices. If you already have a set that you like, stick with it as your main set for a week or two to get comfortable with it before changing it up. Have fun, collecting cool sets of darts is part of the joy.
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I went to the local dart shop, gave them my price range and asked them to bring anything and everything out for me to try, but not to tell me the price or manufacturer. Then, as they watched me throw and I gave feedback, we refined the candidates until two remained. We set them aside and I browsed the store for about 20 minutes. Then returned to the board, and one set stood out more than the other. So I bought them. I loved the look and feel and as Pidge described, I had confidence in them.

I took them home, and that evening threw my first ever 180.

Currently, my collection includes ... 1 set of darts.
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My advice would be to find a set that you can grip consistantly and comfortably to begin with, a straight barrel with ring grip tends to be a good starting point because you can change accordingly once you have a semi consistant throw...I wouldnt overthink barrels at this stage, but do pick one and give it some time rather than chopping and changing between your 10....stem length and flight shape can also make a big difference too if you find a barrel thats comfortable but not 'landing' in a way that suits.
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Thanks everyone for the comments.


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I recently got back into the game 2 months ago. I havent played for several years, and also that time i was playing soft dart. this means i pretty much started from scratch equipment wise.
What i found out for me, is that just a straight barrel with the sametype of grip all over the barrel helped me a lot with finding out how i naturally hold it. I had some barrels with like fixed sections where you "should" grip it, but there was no "feeling". now with a straight barrel, i feel like i can decide wherever i want to grip it, untill it feels right. Meaning i can force my grip on the barrel instead of having a barrel that forces me to use a certain grip. 

BTW talking about thoose darts (but there are tons like it Mission Komodo GX M1


Have a good day
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I was watching the Premier League during the week and pretty much every player except Aspinal was playing with a straight barrelled ring grip dart.

I’m a few sets into my testing at the moment and I’m finding that the grip level is making quite a big difference to comfort and also the barrel thickness. I seem to struggle to control a long thin barrel compared to a shorter thick one. I rest my ring finger on the dart point and with the thinner darts this can effect the release a lot more than on a thicker dart for me.


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(04-25-2021, 09:35 AM)Westy182 Wrote: I was watching the Premier League during the week and pretty much every player except Aspinal was playing with a straight barrelled ring grip dart.

I’m a few sets into my testing at the moment and I’m finding that the grip level is making quite a big difference to comfort and also the barrel thickness. I seem to struggle to control a long thin barrel compared to a shorter thick one. I rest my ring finger on the dart point and with the thinner darts this can effect the release a lot more than on a thicker dart for me.


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I think the fact that most pros uses straight barrelled ring grip dart is just a refection of what most people start out with as beginners. It becomes most players personal preference. It obviously works but you can't say it's universally better than everything else. 

Similarly you can't say that men is fundamentally better than women at darts just because almost all pros are men. It's just a refection of who start out playing darts from the beginning.
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(04-25-2021, 12:24 PM)treble16 Wrote:
(04-25-2021, 09:35 AM)Westy182 Wrote: I was watching the Premier League during the week and pretty much every player except Aspinal was playing with a straight barrelled ring grip dart.

I’m a few sets into my testing at the moment and I’m finding that the grip level is making quite a big difference to comfort and also the barrel thickness. I seem to struggle to control a long thin barrel compared to a shorter thick one. I rest my ring finger on the dart point and with the thinner darts this can effect the release a lot more than on a thicker dart for me.


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I think the fact that most pros uses straight barrelled ring grip dart is just a refection of what most people start out with as beginners. It becomes most players personal preference. It obviously works but you can't say it's universally better than everything else. 

Similarly you can't say that men is fundamentally better than women at darts just because almost all pros are men. It's just a refection of who start out playing darts from the beginning.


Personally I feel that darts manufacturers keep coming up with new ideas for grip styles and colours purely for marketing reasons otherwise they’d never sell any darts. We’d all buy 1 set and use them for life.

I think that the reason most pros have a simple ring style straight dart is because that’s all that’s needed (along with a lot of talent) to succeed. Peter Wright has been through countless amounts of darts and keeps returning to a straight barrelled simple design.

I guess what I’m trying to say is that I’m sure that if I just stuck to the first ever set of barrels I bought, (a straight barrelled design) and practiced and practiced that I would probably be better than I am now after multiple sets and all the “testing” of weights and grips.


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Well it’s been 3 months still I posted this. I fell into the trap of buying up lots of darts and then felt like I needed to hit a 180 with each set before I could move on. This has been a massive pain in the arse as I only average 1 maximum a week!

I’m on my last 3 sets of darts (trying to hit a max) and I think I’m actually getting somewhere…..

After I bought the Jelle Klaasen Unicorn Phase 2 darts and found I threw them well I’ve ended up collecting Klaasen darts. Up to 5 sets so far. These are a good length and thickness for me but they are not the darts that I feel are best suited to me. Most of Klaasen’s barrels are crazy shapes and although I do throw them well I feel I’ve whittled down over 20 sets of darts to 2….. and they’re both straight ring grip barrels Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

21g Red Dragon Rebels
48mm long 6.3mm wide

23g Target Rob Cross
48mm long 6.6 wide

I have also had some great success with 2 sets of Winmau Bobby George darts that are both around 48.mm and 6.8mm wide. As you can see the length and width are all very similar.

Once I’ve hit maximums on these last 3 sets (Loxley Robins, Target RVB gen 2, Masterdart Jelle Klaasen) I feel like I can fully concentrate on some quality practice sessions with the Rebels and the Rob Cross’ to see which are the best for me.


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So After months of trial and error I think I’ve settled upon the best darts for me from my collection. These are the 21g Red Dragon Rebels. Annoyingly they were the very first set of tungsten darts that I bought back in February this year. I could have saved myself a lot of time, effort, and money if I’d just stuck with these from the start, but where’s the fun in that Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

My current setup is as follows:

21g Red Dragon Rebel
48mm long
6.3mm wide

30mm Target Firestorm Diamond points
Tweenie nylon stems
L Style Standard flight with Champagne caps

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Since sticking to these darts I’ve started to get more and more accurate and I’ve seen better averages and finishing.

The only small gripe I have about the dart is the grip level. It has a sharp ring grip which sometimes snags on my finger or thumb upon release. However, I’ve found this grip to be a good allrounder as I play darts in my garage all year round and so I need a grip that works in the hot and cold months.

Now it’s time to put in the hard work with this set and hopefully I’ll start to see some noticeable improvement in my game.


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