Shot Darts

Help improving the average
Hi everyone hope you're all enjoying the christmas break and not letting lockdown get ya down!
I've been playing properly since end of August and as you may expect saw my average improve well for the first couple months. I'm currently averaging between 50-60 depending on how well I finish...
i try and practice quite a lot but seem to have hit a stalemate and I haven'tnt seen any improvement average wise for a while now. Any tips?
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Yes dont worry about averages, work on all parts of your game
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Improvement isn't always a constant, there will be peaks and valleys along the way.
Enjoy what you are doing, have fun, and try not to over think it too much.
If you know what I'm doing, don't tell me .... I find bliss in my confusion.
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Score more, finish better.
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B: 23g   S: Short   F: No. 6   180s: 0/13
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I have found a few things have helped me.
1. Don’t be afraid to go for the cover shots. I used to get a lot of bounce outs caused by the incoming dart being deflected. I now regularly switch, get fewer darts on the floor and improved success with T19 and T18.
2. When you get down to the 200’s keep half an eye on the score and plan your way out. The better you are at this the less you momentum will be effected by having to stop and do some maths.
3. Practice your common outs for me; 20,10,5. 16,8,4. 18,9. And most important, double 1.
Darts:One80 R2 rebel, harrows atomic or designa dark thunder 24g
Stems: harrows supergrip 
Flights: harrows marathon
Board: blade 5
Lighting: unicorn solar flare
Highest out:158
Best leg: 13
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Thanks for the tips
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Its easy to see progress early. Once you hit the 50 and definitely around 60 it's going to slow drastically. You want to start looking at progress over longer periods like 3/6/12 months.



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Technique. Technique is the only thing that stops a dart player from improving so early on. Lots of players develop a natural technique and very rarely stick to that technique past the first year. Even the pros find fault in their throws and correct them throughout their careers.

Improving on your technique will improve your consistency. Hitting more 60 visits instead of 45 or 41. Technique will turn a 45 into a 60, a 60 into 100, a 100 into a 140 and a 140 into a 180.

Pros are very much in the process of turning the 140 into a 180 and you seem to be at the 45 into 60 stage given your averages. Very minor tweaks can quickly change you into hitting all 3 darts into at least the big number you was going for and help you hit a double when you have 3 darts. This alone will push your average to just over 60, then as your technique improves you can aim to hit at least 1 treble each visit.

The idea of just have fun with it is all well and good, but lots of players give darts up because they get frustrated by seeing no improvement. Darts becomes fun when you see regular improvement and a light at the end of the tunnel.
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When I had this problem, I reviewed what I was doing throughout the throwing motion, and couldn't see any problem. However, I noted that during my journey up to a specific average, it involved a lot of focus and concentration on each dart thrown, however, I had got very used to that throwing action, and it was less focussed, and more muscle memory. This then allowed for any bad elements of my throw to creep in un-noticed.

To combat this, I swap darts during my practice sessions. The change of darts forces my brain into adjusting to the different shape/weight, and as such re-introduces the focus on the throwing actions.

This worked for me, although your mileage may vary.

Obviously, there will eventually be a point where the averages no longer go up, and it may not be as high as you want it to be (even the pros can't maintain 120+ averages). Don't be put off by this, and just keep enjoying your darts.
Current Darts
21g Red Dragon Milano RS
23g Target Distinction Orion (Match Darts)
22g Talisman Gold (thanks to Getagrip)
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(01-13-2021, 01:40 PM)Pidge Wrote: Technique. Technique is the only thing that stops a dart player from improving so early on. Lots of players develop a natural technique and very rarely stick to that technique past the first year. Even the pros find fault in their throws and correct them throughout their careers.

Improving on your technique will improve your consistency. Hitting more 60 visits instead of 45 or 41. Technique will turn a 45 into a 60, a 60 into 100, a 100 into a 140 and a 140 into a 180.

Pros are very much in the process of turning the 140 into a 180 and you seem to be at the 45 into 60 stage given your averages. Very minor tweaks can quickly change you into hitting all 3 darts into at least the big number you was going for and help you hit a double when you have 3 darts. This alone will push your average to just over 60, then as your technique improves you can aim to hit at least 1 treble each visit.

The idea of just have fun with it is all well and good, but lots of players give darts up because they get frustrated by seeing no improvement. Darts becomes fun when you see regular improvement and a light at the end of the tunnel.

I fully agree with you there and I actually filmed myself throwing from the side and slowed it down and could see where the inconsistency comes from. Theres the standard issue of releasing and snatching some throws which will just take practice to iron out but how I release the darts is different almost every time. It was strange to watch back and although I notice it more now its proving hard to correct. Thanks for the advice though think you're spot on ?
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I used to play for long periods until I was fatigued and my form was terrible, and I never got anywhere. What I've realized over the years, is that you need rest to form good muscle memory. Short practice with good form, then rest before the form goes bad. That way you are reinforcing the good form as much as possible, and not inadvertently reinforcing bad form.

My board is set up in my office, so I throw maybe 30 darts at a time, and break for work / lunch. My form gets better throughout the day until I get tired and then I stop, because I don't want to reinforce the bad form.

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(Yesterday, 06:11 PM)Roadto180 Wrote:
(01-13-2021, 01:40 PM)Pidge Wrote: Technique. Technique is the only thing that stops a dart player from improving so early on. Lots of players develop a natural technique and very rarely stick to that technique past the first year. Even the pros find fault in their throws and correct them throughout their careers.

Improving on your technique will improve your consistency. Hitting more 60 visits instead of 45 or 41. Technique will turn a 45 into a 60, a 60 into 100, a 100 into a 140 and a 140 into a 180.

Pros are very much in the process of turning the 140 into a 180 and you seem to be at the 45 into 60 stage given your averages. Very minor tweaks can quickly change you into hitting all 3 darts into at least the big number you was going for and help you hit a double when you have 3 darts. This alone will push your average to just over 60, then as your technique improves you can aim to hit at least 1 treble each visit.

The idea of just have fun with it is all well and good, but lots of players give darts up because they get frustrated by seeing no improvement. Darts becomes fun when you see regular improvement and a light at the end of the tunnel.

I fully agree with you there and I actually filmed myself throwing from the side and slowed it down and could see where the inconsistency comes from. Theres the standard issue of releasing and snatching some throws which will just take practice to iron out but how I release the darts is different almost every time. It was strange to watch back and although I notice it more now its proving hard to correct. Thanks for the advice though think you're spot on ?
Snatching in my experience comes from a poor draw back that is off line. It’s almost like the brain tells you to not throw the dart because it knows you’ve pulled it back off line and you end up snatching at it as your subconscious screams stop the throw but your arm ignores it. 

I can guarantee the issue you’ve seen in your release isn’t a problem with your hand. The more you look into poor or inconsistent releases the more evident it becomes that it’s down to not pulling the dart back the same way each time. If you draw the dart back differently each time then the thing at the opposite end of that - the release - will be different each time. 

If I was you I’d really spend some time looking at gripping exactly the same way each time and not starting the throw until you’ve got a grip you’re happy with. Then look at pulling the dart back. Break it down in some self analysis and try to make it as repeatable as possible using reference points where you can. For example I aim the flight at the target and I pull back so the flight brushes in between my eyes. I get a physical reference (the feeling of the flight touching my face) point each throw so I know if I was off. If you draw back consistently then you will release consistently.
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