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the hardest lesson ive had to learn about darts
this is my own personal opinion of course but i think it deserves to be said. what would you say the hardest thing to learn, control, or master is? figuring out dart weight? shaft length? flight size? stance? grip? tempo?

i say the absolute hardest thing to learn about this game is this: humility.

thats right. and i would also say that patience is a very close second. sooner or later what happen to me last night will happen to you. i was playing in a local tournament. not many teams and there wasnt anyone there was a superstar. in fact, i was bar none the best player in the field. traditionally i havent really done all that well in these local tourneys because its really more of a social thing and isnt serious at all. nobody is expecting to pay their utilities with the earnings. to make a long story short we ended up getting trounced by a team that was really, really bad. i didnt play exceptional, but it wasnt really horrible. they just outplayed us really. just unbelievable shots. they had 51 left and a guy who had been playing for literally 3 days hit a T16 S1 D1. what???? you could give me 20 shots at that and i might hit it once. i had played this guy the last 2 days (when he first picked up a dart) and it was just incredible the shots he was making. first shot in cricket was a 6 mark. it was just really ridiculous. 


my point is that i was so furious. i mean mad as hell. i kept thinking that i practice hours and hours every week. i probably put more time on the board than everyone else in the tournament combined and i get taken out like that? i had to smile and shake hands and congratulate them. but on the inside i was steaming mad. after several minutes i did calm down and i actually felt good and proud of the team that beat us because they played the game of their life. they probably wont see playing like that from themselves for a very long time. they did what they had to do and i didnt. so that was that. 

but it is so hard to not want to give up and throw the darts in the trash when something like that happens. this was the worst defeat that that i can remember, hands down. just to think about getting demolished by people who couldnt hit dead fish in a bucket is devastating to my ego. so today ive done a lot of thinking about it and thats why i think that humility is the hardest thing to learn, not only in darts, but also in life. i know that if we played those same games 100 times we would most likely win 99 easy. but that one loss hurts more than the joy that comes from 99 victories combined. 

so its back to practice for me. but from now im not only going to be aware of my throw, my grip, my stance, and my tempo but im also going to be aware that i can be beaten by anyone at any time. im not sure how to actually practice that but its definitely something thats going to be in the back of my head for a long, long time. its a lesson that everyone here either has already learned or will learn at some point if you play long enough. i guess humility isnt something thats taught, its earned. 

thanks for reading my story guys, i really appreciate it.

MC
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I can relate.... sometimes I throw such good darts, a level my opponents would never reach. Yet I somehow manage to lose almost every game I play Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
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Well written MC (+1)

I'm with you and I think you can only learn humility the hard way, by taking the unexpected defeats and moving on. One of the beauties of sport is that the best player doesn't always win; imagine how boring it would be if they did? Actually, you don't need to imagine when players like Phil Taylor and MvG have dominant runs...!

My personal perspective on this has changed over the last year... In B grade I was (somewhat) the "you" in the story. I was in the top 5-10 players in the comp and I won a lot more games than I lost. I remember one night being drawn against a guy I'd not seen before in the first round of singles. I'd warmed up quite well and was feeling good. As my game got closer this guy still hadn't arrived so I was half expecting a forfeit.

When my game came up he walked through the door, said "Sorry I'm late", took out his darts and was good to go without a single warm up dart. He had this wild throw - like a Raphael Nadal forehand - and from the start every visit of his that I can remember had a big treble in it....76....85.....66.....81. No tons or 3 in a segment. I was nowhere to be seen and he took out D14 first dart. He slowed down in the second leg and I had two darts at tops, which I missed, and he took his double out first dart. Like you I was shellshocked and angry; all I could think was "How the f--- did this guy beat me??!?!" He had what was clearly one of his better days and I didn't. End of story!

But now in A grade I am, to a certain extent, the "him" in the story. A lot of players expect to beat me and generally they have been doing that. Generally, but not always! Sometimes my level is up enough and there's down enough that I can get over the line against them.

Darts: Harrows Glen Durrant Duzza Series 2 24g, short Harrows Supergrip shafts, Harrows flights (Marathon/Retina/Optix/Rapide) 


Best 501: 13 darts (League), 14 darts (Pro Darter)

Best Checkout: 154 (League), 160 (Pro Darter)
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I wish I had that problem. You go, darters! It seems to me darts is a lesson in humility on a continual basis.  :dodgy:
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Thunk, thunk, thunk, walk, chalk, pull, turn, walk, turn, repeat...

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(06-29-2016, 09:38 PM)mcockrell Wrote: this is my own personal opinion of course but i think it deserves to be said. what would you say the hardest thing to learn, control, or master is? figuring out dart weight? shaft length? flight size? stance? grip? tempo?

i say the absolute hardest thing to learn about this game is this: humility.

thats right. and i would also say that patience is a very close second. sooner or later what happen to me last night will happen to you. i was playing in a local tournament. not many teams and there wasnt anyone there was a superstar. in fact, i was bar none the best player in the field. traditionally i havent really done all that well in these local tourneys because its really more of a social thing and isnt serious at all. nobody is expecting to pay their utilities with the earnings. to make a long story short we ended up getting trounced by a team that was really, really bad. i didnt play exceptional, but it wasnt really horrible. they just outplayed us really. just unbelievable shots. they had 51 left and a guy who had been playing for literally 3 days hit a T16 S1 D1. what???? you could give me 20 shots at that and i might hit it once. i had played this guy the last 2 days (when he first picked up a dart) and it was just incredible the shots he was making. first shot in cricket was a 6 mark. it was just really ridiculous. 


my point is that i was so furious. i mean mad as hell. i kept thinking that i practice hours and hours every week. i probably put more time on the board than everyone else in the tournament combined and i get taken out like that? i had to smile and shake hands and congratulate them. but on the inside i was steaming mad. after several minutes i did calm down and i actually felt good and proud of the team that beat us because they played the game of their life. they probably wont see playing like that from themselves for a very long time. they did what they had to do and i didnt. so that was that. 

but it is so hard to not want to give up and throw the darts in the trash when something like that happens. this was the worst defeat that that i can remember, hands down. just to think about getting demolished by people who couldnt hit dead fish in a bucket is devastating to my ego. so today ive done a lot of thinking about it and thats why i think that humility is the hardest thing to learn, not only in darts, but also in life. i know that if we played those same games 100 times we would most likely win 99 easy. but that one loss hurts more than the joy that comes from 99 victories combined. 

so its back to practice for me. but from now im not only going to be aware of my throw, my grip, my stance, and my tempo but im also going to be aware that i can be beaten by anyone at any time. im not sure how to actually practice that but its definitely something thats going to be in the back of my head for a long, long time. its a lesson that everyone here either has already learned or will learn at some point if you play long enough. i guess humility isnt something thats taught, its earned. 

thanks for reading my story guys, i really appreciate it.

MC
 
 Excellent post... great story with an important moral....easy reputation point +1 thanks

regards

Dorian
Dorian
Son of Merlin

Caerleon - Wales

(Mission "KURO" M4 rear taper design- 23GmYellow Kite Shape Flights 100 micron & Solid Brass Stems)

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My father Merlin, once told me that "You should end up pointing to what you were aiming at when you've released the Dart."




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Good story and good points made MC and also Banz. Humility is a tough one to learn and I think that the competitor inside of us stops us from being total humble. It's how we learn to deal with it and move on that matters.
For me focus continues to be an area that I am finding difficult and need to work on. I can get distracted or let my mind wonder if I don't fully immerse myself in my practice or match
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Darts Setup: 23g DPC Extreme Performance, Black Target Pro Grip Stems, Target Vision 100 Standard Flights, 35mm Gold CD Mk3 Points
Previous Darts Setup: 23g DPC Gun Metal Elite, Medium Black Target Pro Grip Stems, Standard Black V180 Flights, 30mm Black Grooved Storm Points

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(06-30-2016, 08:41 AM)ElusiveDouble85 Wrote: Good story and good points made MC and also Banz. Humility is a tough one to learn and I think that the competitor inside of us stops us from being total humble. It's how we learn to deal with it and move on that matters.
For me focus continues to be an area that I am finding difficult and need to work on. I can get distracted or let my mind wonder if I don't fully immerse myself in my practice or match

i just realized only recently that match focus was something that i definitely need to work on. when i see the pros on tv they are all business. nobody daps or "good shots" unless its like a 9 darter or something like that. normally i am the type of player that says good shot or some kind of encouragement when they miss horribly. but i have recently learned that it takes a lot away from focusing on what i need to do. recently at a regional qualifier i was chatting with a few of the big timers and they all said the same thing. they said they dont do any of that until after the match. they basically said that when they are playing it is war. you want to punch, kick, claw, anything you can to win and its hard to do that if you are socializing as well. i have found that it helps a good bit to eliminate that distraction.
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(07-01-2016, 03:44 PM)mcockrell Wrote:  normally i am the type of player that says good shot or some kind of encouragement when they miss horribly. 

The best way to stop this is to not even watch them when they throw. I never watch my opponent, i either look at the floor or the score. After the handshake after the bull-off i don't talk till the end of the game.
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I try my best to swicth off during a match and just concentrate on what I'm doing. Generally, although not always, what my opponent is doing does not bother me. My issue is more a mind drift. Thinking what if I do this or if I hit this shot I can make an X dart leg etc instead of just retaining my focus and throwing the darts and letting the legs come. I know what I need to do and I am getting better at recognising when my mind starts to wander, but it's going to take work. In order to improve though I am will put the effort in
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Darts Setup: 23g DPC Extreme Performance, Black Target Pro Grip Stems, Target Vision 100 Standard Flights, 35mm Gold CD Mk3 Points
Previous Darts Setup: 23g DPC Gun Metal Elite, Medium Black Target Pro Grip Stems, Standard Black V180 Flights, 30mm Black Grooved Storm Points

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Put me in the ignore my opponent camp. When it's their throw I either stand with my back to the board or I look at my flights. I try to take some deep breaths and think about how my nice smooth throw feels in practice.

The only time I pay attention to my opponent's score is when I'm on a finish, to know to go for the bullseye or set up a double.

I don't really see it as a war and I'm not "doing anything to win". I just find it easier to take them out of the equation as much as possible.

Darts: Harrows Glen Durrant Duzza Series 2 24g, short Harrows Supergrip shafts, Harrows flights (Marathon/Retina/Optix/Rapide) 


Best 501: 13 darts (League), 14 darts (Pro Darter)

Best Checkout: 154 (League), 160 (Pro Darter)
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Great posts guys.
I'm in the mist of learning my most valuable lesson now. After starting to play just over a year ago I was care free and winning games with no nerves. I hadn't planned on becoming a regular darter, just filling in for my dads team as they were a player short.Then winning games followed enjoyment which meant I got the darts bug.
Practice has given me an approved game but also more pressure. Now I really struggle with nerves, I'm a much better player now, I just cant stop shaking. I lose games I shouldn't be losing. Some weeks are worse than others but the shakes are always there.
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Probably considered the best heavyweight fighter, ever ! Even Muhammad Ali got his butt whopped a couple of times.
Bulls 22g Blackpool B's, medium spinner stems with raw75 flights
2017: Ton80's .. .. .. 1
2017: 3 bulls .. .. .. 1

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Great post, +1 from me too. I think everyone's been on that end of it, losing to an opponent that you really shouldn't! There have been points where I've thought "what really is the point of practising so hard and being dedicated if this is the result..."

That said those lessons have made me realize (after far too long) that I can't really control that. Simply focus on the things I can control, and whatever else happens, happens. I also never look at my opponent play unless they're on a makeable outshot (so realistically less than 100) because I can't control what my opponent does.
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When I hear of absolute/near beginners making great shots/3-shot combinations, I have to wonder if they're telling porkies re: their experience.

3 days experience and hits a T16 S1 D1? And others on the team hit similar? Sounds like they low-balled on their resumes!
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