Japanese Quality Darts and Dart Accessories shop.

Getting Motivation
Hey Nutz, ich got a big problem in the last month.
I made progress in darts (scoring and doubles) but in the last month I didn't see any progress and I lost the motivation in darts...
Maybe one of you were in a similar situation and knows how to get motivation back?
I am thankful for all help and information  Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply
I always just take some time off... no darts... then get back at it!

You just need to plug away at it! Force yourself.
Playing matches against people, either in person or online, seems to help.

It's always fun when you can see yourself improving... but champions are built on losses, not wins.

Reply
this pretty much happens to me on a weekly basis.

i will come out one day and just rip it up for a few days straight. then ill go a few days feeling like i actually regressed instead of getting better. i think it happens to everyone. it doesnt mean much of anything. even the pros have bad days/weeks/months. my advice is give it a few days off and try again. what you definitely do not want to happen is for you to keep pushing it and get more and more frustrated and end up falling into some bad habits. thats happened to me quite a few times. ive found that if i just force myself to take a few days off and do something else that when i come back to it im refreshed and eager to pick up where i left off.

just remember that progress is a relative term and doesnt necessarily have anything to do with where your darts are landing. its about building a consistent throw. so if youre struggling, keep this in mind. there are lots of time where i am struggling and i have to remind myself of this. so i will do practice exercises where i dont keep up with where the dart goes but keep my body still, or my elbow from moving, or any number of different things that i usually start doing because im struggling.

hope this helps in some way
MC
Reply
yeah sometimes a break can be a great help to refresh the mind Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Subscribe to Darts Review Channel here: Darts Review Channel on Youtube

Click to visit Darts Review Channel website

My darts collection:
Flickr Album

Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply
As said above, a break can work wonders - even a few days...Nothing worse than having to force yourself to stand at the board and it can bring bad habbits into your game that can affect your game.

Let us know how you get on Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply
actually i stop every time i start getting frustrated. it happens a lot to me right after a big win or a huge night. i think my problem is that after i play really, really well my expectations go way up but my focus goes way down. that is, i expect to do well because i did well the day before so instead of actually trying and focusing i just chuck it and expect everything to go my way. zombie chucking is still a very real issue to me and its something that i have to work on constantly, whether im doing well or not.

playing online a lot recently has helped me in this regard. before i would just do some practice sessions and in between i would play a bot or computer. but seeing as how there are no rewards for doing well nor any consequences for doing poorly i always end up at some point losing focus and zombie chucking. but playing, for me anyway, helps me keep that focus because it is real and other people can see what youre doing so you definitely want to stay focused at all times.

but anytime i feel myself getting too frustrated i either stop completely, which is very very hard to do for me because i hate quitting. it makes me want to play more when im doing bad than when im doing good. or i will pick up another set of darts and toss those around a bit. ive found that using "strange" darts has helped me numerous times find flaws in my stroke or my stance or grip. recently ive found out that i can also achieve this just by using different flights. i use large flights and i never have been able to use smaller ones. but when i put smaller ones on i can pinpoint things im doing wrong just by looking at the dart when it leaves my hand and analyzing the angles of how it sticks in the board.

plus, just by trying something new or different your mind tends to refocus itself automatically, or mine does anyway.

MC
Reply
(06-27-2016, 02:20 PM)Toron Wrote: Hey Nutz, ich got a big problem in the last month.
I made progress in darts (scoring and doubles) but in the last month I didn't see any progress and I lost the motivation in darts...
Maybe one of you were in a similar situation and knows how to get motivation back?
I am thankful for all help and information  Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Been there a few times for not seeing improvement and it's demoralising for sure.  It's messed with my head and had me hesitant to pick my darts up a few times.

I've had to step back and take a look at where I was going wrong and then direct my focus on improving that, instead of just plugging away hoping it would iron itself out.  Sure, my game would take a performance hit (I weren't happy with it anyway, so nowt to lose) but in time things were improving and started to kick my game into a higher gear.  This has worked for me more than once.

So on my own experience... My advice would be to take a break from 'your usual practice'.  Don't stop throwing darts entirely, I think that's pointless, you'll learn nothing hiding from an issue that needs fixing.  Try and work out what you think is your biggest flaw at the moment and spend some real focus time trying to improve/correct it.  

One possibility is that you might have just reached the peak of your tecnique and you just need to tweak that to get things moving again.  This is probably a rinse and repeat throughout your darting life.
__Your forum needs you... to contribute to the Dart Specs Database: Steel Tip (572) / Soft Tip (90) - Last update: July 2017
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply
very well put. thats very much what i was trying to say in my posts but i think you said it a lot better. i try to focus on one thing that im doing wrong and ill do something like A2 where ill throw at a number but it really doesnt matter where the first goes. then ill try to group the others in a tight radius while focusing on whatever issue that ive determined needed work. if its grip then ill do nothing but try to group the darts while focusing on keeping the exact same group.

also, without really knowing how or what you practice i can say that throwing at doubles always seems to help me when i get in a slump. ill do around the clock throwing at doubles once or twice and even if i did poorly at it, my stroke seems to come back to me at some point during the drill. and if nothing else once im done with that drill i usually end up doing a lot better because after throwing at the tiny double space, the fat part of the numbers seems HUGE.

but yeah like swiiiitch said, its possible you are nearing your peak for what you are doing now. when you first start out at anything for make any drastic changes you will see a lot of improvement in a very short period of time, provided you are doing everything else right. thats because you have a lot of room to improve. but at some point that improvement will slow down as you start to get the hang of the basic fundamentals and mechanics. then its all about tweaking what you have to fine tune things and thats where you see a difference between the really really good players and everyone else. a lot of people will stop changing at that point either because they are think they will keep improving doing what they are doing, or because they are stubborn and fear that changing anything will make them regress. it probably will make you regress a little bit, and thats probably why a lot of people dont do it. they dont understand that you will most likely suffer some before you get better. any change takes some time to get used to and unfortunately a lot of people just wont invest that time.

and as he also said, this will most likely continue to happen for as long as you play the game. there is always something that all of us need to improve, even the pros. identifying it and investing the time and energy to fix it is what will elevate your game to the next level and cause you to continue to improve.
Reply
In addition to what the others have said I'm going to ask the following questions:

Q: When you say that you made progress previously, and then saw no further progress last month, how are you measuring this?

I take a very analytical approach to practice and have graphs and spreadsheets for lots of the things I do.  While this is not for everyone what it shows me is that at times I am improving even when it feels as if I am not.  I think this is important as personal perception is not a very accurate way to measure these things.  (I have days where I think I've thrown badly but my stats show my PPT etc was absolutely normal.)

One of the more useful things I record are the results of my Pro-Darter games.  PD provides me a breakdown of (among other things) my PPT and number of scores in various bands (20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 140, 180) which is great for seeing what is going on in detail.  These graphs can often show small positive trends that I might not otherwise notice.  This is great motivation for continuing what I'm doing as well as highlighting areas of my practice routine that may need to change.

If you want to see how I approached improving my standard then there's my Deliberate Practice thread which I'm always happy to plug.  Maybe have a strong coffee ready if you're planning to read the whole thing.

Q: How are you practicing?

I'm a big believer in the idea that there are different types of practice.  If you're interested in what they are then this thread and article by David Sproull is a great place to start.  Maybe think about how and what you're practicing; there may be a better way!

I'm an advocate of Flight School and believe that the A2 and A1 drills will, if done properly, make people better at darts.  If you're not doing them you should think about starting.

Another great thread and article to read, if you're interested, is this one on Deliberate Practice by Dorian.  It was the inspiration for my DP regime and has been one of the most important things I've read about practice.  

I was stagnating in the mid- to low-50 PPT range at the end of last year but since doing my DP routine I've seen my PPT increase month-on-month to be consistently in the mid-60's now.  My upper limit in this time has gone from 60 PPT to 70 PPT.  This has been achieved not by doing any extra practice, but by doing the right practice.

Darts: Harrows Glen Durrant Duzza Series 2 24g, short Harrows Supergrip shafts, Harrows flights (Marathon/Retina/Optix/Rapide) 


Best 501: 13 darts (League), 14 darts (Pro Darter)

Best Checkout: 154 (League), 160 (Pro Darter)
Reply
(06-27-2016, 04:57 PM)mcockrell Wrote: because i did well the day before so instead of actually trying and focusing i just chuck it and expect everything to go my way. zombie chucking is still a very real issue to me and its something that i have to work on constantly, whether im doing well or not.

This is something that I find myself doing, even after all the years I've been throwing! If I find myself doing this I make a real effort to get the focus back and if it doesn't then I stop my session and try again later or the next day. Zombit throwing, as you put it (I like that phrase!), will do you no good whatsoever and will most likely do more harm.
Rather than stopping practice I would try out a different routine, change things up a bit to see if that brings some focus, determination and motivation back. If that doesn't work then and only then would I take a break. Avoid it completely until the urge to get on the board becomes too much and then you are good to go again
=========================================================================================
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Darts Setup: 23g DPC Extreme Performance, Black Target Pro Grip Stems, Target Vision 100 Standard Flights, 35mm Gold CD Mk3 Points
Previous Darts Setup: 23g DPC Gun Metal Elite, Medium Black Target Pro Grip Stems, Standard Black V180 Flights, 30mm Black Grooved Storm Points

Reply
Thanks guys for the quick reply
I think I will start with the DP and it will be a hard way but I think I can do it because i am really ambitious.
@Banz most of the time I practice the A1 from flight school and I also practice 170.
My problem is that I shoot too far to the left so if I aim at 20's I mostly hit 5's and on 19's I hit the 7's, on bull also trhe left side of the board 8's,  14's, 11's.
The point of not seeing further progress is that I really don't know what to change to get it fixed.
I tried a lot of stuff change stance darts etc. but nothing worked out for me.
The last months I tried to controll the height of my throw which worked pretty well but as I said i mostly hit the 5's or the T5's
Any tips on how get it fixed or at least get to know why I am shooting too far to the left?
Reply
if your darts are always going in a certain direction then you can bet its 1 of 2 things:

1) your arm is traveling in that direction when you release. if you have your forearm perfectly vertical then you should be able to easily spot this. if you have sort of a lazy vertical like me then it could be that you are releasing too early before your forearm breaks the plane. this one may a little harder to correct. when I used to do this my solution was pulling my elbow in a little more toward vertical on those numbers.

2) when you draw back to throw, STOP! look at where the dart tip is pointing. you would be very surprised at how many people have the same issue and its because when the grip the dart it points off to one side. this was a huge problem for me for a long time and like you I had no idea what I was doing wrong. one day I was throwing and instead of looking at my aim spot I just watched the dart the whole time from drawing back through the release and I saw plain as day that my dart tip was pointed left. in my case it was a combination of my lazy vertical forearm and my grip (mainly my middle finger pushing against the tip to provide stability). I took a while to figure it out and to fix it. lots of experimenting but I corrected it my just resting the point on my finger instead of pushing on it, and also extending my arm out further which allowed me to move my elbow in to get a little more vertical than what I was.

I cant tell you how many people I have helped just from number 2 there. its easy to miss because you aren't looking at the dart you are looking at what you are aiming at. its pretty easy to spot an angular problem if you pay attention because its in your peripheral vision as you throw. but in order to see what the dart tip is doing throughout the throw requires you to look at it and nothing else. so its something you have to do intentionally and if you don't you probably wont ever see it.

hope this helps.
MC
Reply
also, everyone who said don't stop is correct and I didn't mean to insinuate that you stop whenever things aren't going your way. obviously that wont help out much. what I meant to say that was when you start to get frustrated then its a good idea to take a break. lots of times I find myself doing poorly and I end up getting frustrated to the point that I lose my focus and im rushing myself, or throwing too hard, or whatever. at that point you are doing yourself no good so stop, drink a beer or something. put some music on. go to a different practice routine and try again. if you are doing A1 then do doubles or something. or do a round of around the clock. anything to take your mind off it.

when I first started doing A1 it was the most frustrating thing. it would take me 3 or 4 days to finish it because after an hour or so I would have to stop and do something else. but hang in there and give it time and it will help you. before long you will become and A1 addict like Banz and I. once you really learn and understand how to use A1 to help you there is no way to keep from becoming a full blown addict.
Reply
(06-28-2016, 05:21 PM)mcockrell Wrote: also, everyone who said don't stop is correct and I didn't mean to insinuate that you stop whenever things aren't going your way. obviously that wont help out much. what I meant to say that was when you start to get frustrated then its a good idea to take a break. lots of times I find myself doing poorly and I end up getting frustrated to the point that I lose my focus and im rushing myself, or throwing too hard, or whatever. at that point you are doing yourself no good so stop, drink a beer or something. put some music on. go to a different practice routine and try again. if you are doing A1 then do doubles or something. or do a round of around the clock. anything to take your mind off it.

when I first started doing A1 it was the most frustrating thing. it would take me 3 or 4 days to finish it because after an hour or so I would have to stop and do something else. but hang in there and give it time and it will help you. before long you will become and A1 addict like Banz and I. once you really learn and understand how to use A1 to help you there is no way to keep from becoming a full blown addict.

This is sound advice in my opinion.

When I first started practicing seriously around September last year I would have good days and bad days but I never really knew why. I started working out, in simple terms, a throw I could use when the wheels came off. I called it "Robo Banz" as it was not very natural but it allowed me to grind out visits until I got back on track again. This was especially useful in the league as you can't just walk away if it's not happening.

But over time I found I had to rely on this less & less (and now not at all) and the thing that got me there (here?) was A1 (and A2). Until you can finish in 5 rounds consistently then A1 has a place in your practice routine because it's doing something that no amount of 501 is doing: grooving your throw. I believe you need that dependable throw in place before you can start to perform under the pressure of competitive 501.

Darts: Harrows Glen Durrant Duzza Series 2 24g, short Harrows Supergrip shafts, Harrows flights (Marathon/Retina/Optix/Rapide) 


Best 501: 13 darts (League), 14 darts (Pro Darter)

Best Checkout: 154 (League), 160 (Pro Darter)
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)
Loxley Darts.