Shot Darts

Cheap vs. Expensive
For throwing, not collecting.

Genuine question, not controversial!

What's the difference in a set of darts that cost say £20 and £60?

So the more you pay, generally the higher the percentage of tungsten.  Higher percentage equals greater mass, more weight in less space?  That's great, but what if you don't like throwing  6mm wide dart and prefer something that's 7.5mm....does the tungsten percentage matter??  (I'm new to this so be gentle!).

Are you actually paying for endorsements? If Phil Taylor puts his name to a set of darts, it's not for free.  So if I pay £70 for some Target's, is 30% of that going in his pocket?  Whereas if I buy some £20 darts from say Designa, I'm just paying for the R&D and manufacturing?

I've bought 5 sets of darts since I started, ranging from £15 to £55, I'm throwing best (and therefore sticking with) some that cost be just over 20 quid.

So, why pay say £70 when you can probably get a set that are almost identical for say £30.  There is only so much you can do to a dart to make it different from something else.

I'm new on here but it's something I've wondered about from day one!

Cheers, Mark
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I got some rastas for 25 quid and some target carrera c4 for 50 quid...I prefer the rastas by a country mile
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I just reviewed 2 sets of 95% tungsten darts that cost £10 or $14us.

They are just as good as ANY other dart on the market no matter the cost.

Darts is one of those rare sports where the term "you get what you pay for" isn't true.
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(03-03-2016, 05:48 PM)Cyanide Wrote: I just reviewed 2 sets of 95% tungsten darts that cost £10 or $14us.

They are just as good as ANY other dart on the market no matter the cost.

Darts is one of those rare sports where the term "you get what you pay for" isn't true.

That's what I was thinking, and good to hear.
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The most expensive darts usually always are pro ones so really are just paying for the name
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Price means nothing, just use whatever you feel is right.
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You don't have to pay silly money to get decent darts but even if the darts you buy are badly made, not weighted well etc they could still throw better "FOR YOU" than a set that is precisely engineered and made of the highest quality tungsten.

But a lot of the expensive darts are priced that high for various reasons, in the UK we have higher taxes to pay so its not just the consumer but the retailer and the manufacturer that will have to pay some sort of tax so that adds a big chunk then the retailer needs their profit margin as well as the manufacturer so that adds to it and if it happens that the darts are from a large company and its a dart that has a big advertising budget and more design time and more machining time more employees etc that means they need to make more to cover costs even if they sell mega amounts of the darts and often if its a players dart that has been paid a lot for the name it all adds even more.

Its difficult to quantify all the reasons and how much each reason should realistic be fair in terms of price to the consumer but don't ever get hung up on thinking more cost means better.

I would imagine that when they make say 10,000 sets of a particular dart barrel that the cost per barrel is much reduced and may even be as little as a £1 or so on some designs but they still need to cover all the other costs.

The question we should ask is how much are they taking for simple greed after all the costs are taken into account?

We don't expect them to do it for nothing and as a business they want as much profit as they can get but we will never know how much they make unless someone on the inside tells us, but is that not the same with everything? Whether its products we buy or services we pay for?

But you often tend to get better designs, coatings, tungsten quality with higher priced darts but its not always the case and if the darts don't work for you then what is the point?

There is lots of perfectly good darts for not very much money.
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I sincerely doubt that Taylor gets £30 per set.  More like a couple of pounds, five tops; he got most of his money from Target up front.

"So, why pay say £70 when you can probably get a set that are almost identical for say £30.  There is only so much you can do to a dart to make it different from something else."

If you go down the path of chasing the perfect dart, than "almost" isn't good enough.

In the end, the darts you throw lie at the intersection of what works for you and what you can afford.
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I've shot some of my best games with a $25 set of Puma darts. I've thrown some $135 monster darts... and obviously I've tested some Widows and Hammerheads. I've tried Pixel grips.... etc...

The nodor sets are great bang for the buck... I threw the penetrators for a short bit. I also used the unicorn T95s for a while. All great value as well.

The main differences are: difficulty in manufacturing (pixel grip, coatings), who they are sponsoring (Target has become super expensive for this reason), and advertising.

There is very minimal difference in quality of barrel. Not enough to matter under normal use anyway. Even the 'match weight' stuff is becoming a non issue. You rarely see barrels far off from each other anymore. Machining has become far more precise.

I use customs because of the shape and weight. Considering they are a one-off, hand made dart, $85 shipped is a steal. I'd bet the 95% tungsten billet used costs less than $15... possibly significantly less.
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(03-03-2016, 05:44 PM)mark-essex Wrote: For throwing, not collecting.

Genuine question, not controversial!

What's the difference in a set of darts that cost say £20 and £60?

So the more you pay, generally the higher the percentage of tungsten.  Higher percentage equals greater mass, more weight in less space?  That's great, but what if you don't like throwing  6mm wide dart and prefer something that's 7.5mm....does the tungsten percentage matter??  (I'm new to this so be gentle!).

Are you actually paying for endorsements? If Phil Taylor puts his name to a set of darts, it's not for free.  So if I pay £70 for some Target's, is 30% of that going in his pocket?  Whereas if I buy some £20 darts from say Designa, I'm just paying for the R&D and manufacturing?

I've bought 5 sets of darts since I started, ranging from £15 to £55, I'm throwing best (and therefore sticking with) some that cost be just over 20 quid.

So, why pay say £70 when you can probably get a set that are almost identical for say £30.  There is only so much you can do to a dart to make it different from something else.

I'm new on here but it's something I've wondered about from day one!

Cheers, Mark

... Point 1: The difference will depend on the darts, could be a lot of difference or hardly any differences. Coatings and fancy machining all add to the cost. One of the things I like about Red Dragon as a company because generally you can see why a Dart is priced the way it is. The simplest lowest % darts are the cheapest, go up to  90% and the price goes up a bit, add a coating, goes up a bit more, simple ring grips cheaper than complicated grip patterns and shapes. I don't generally look at their Darts and think "why does that dart cost so much?" It's pretty easy to see how their pricing is worked out.


Point 2, Yes you are definitely paying for endorsements and a cut will go to the player when you buy a signature dart, that's how it works ... Target sell a lot of Darts because they have Taylor's name on them and Taylor gets a cut because it's his name they are using to sell more darts. That's how Pro Skateboarders make money too, they get a cut every time their model board is sold. 


3, Why pay £70 when you can pay £30? I'm the wrong person to ask, I wouldn't pay £70 for a set of darts.

oh and for the tungsten percentages, if I like how the dart feels and throws it's totally irrelevant to me.  

Then you have other factors like advertising, packaging, Country or Origin, Taxes and all that stuff.
.......................................................................................................................................
Darts: Red Dragon Recoil 25g, Red Dragon Andrew Gilding 25g. Stems: Harrows Supergrip, Flights: Harrows
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In the end throw what feels and works for you. From my experience the more expensive darts like Cosmo, One80, Bottlesen etc that I have thrown, I have noticed they are a better in tungsten quality meaning after lots of use, there is less nicks and the grips hold up longer, in which I haven't found in Nodor as an example, albeit you can buy 4 sets to 1. I also like a slim long dart. In my opinion One80 has the best dart made, I do love Cosmo but they are over priced for equal quality.
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So general opinion is...price is irrelevant. That's good for me,I will be buying more averaged priced darts! Or second-hand once I reach 50 posts :-)
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The difference is £40! I throw cheap RD Microlites and expensive Unicorn Sigmas and do well with both of them.
It all depends on what works for you. Of course once the honeymoon period is over then all bets are off as neither the expensive not cheap darts seem to work.
You don't mess with The Voice of Reason. You have the right to be wrong.

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(03-04-2016, 12:22 AM)The D Wrote: The difference is £40! I throw cheap RD Microlites and expensive Unicorn Sigmas and do well with both of them.
It all depends on what works for you. Of course once the honeymoon period is over then all bets are off as neither the expensive not cheap darts seem to work.

Ah, the dreaded Honeymoon period.     I've had it happen where I'll borrow a friends set of darts to try out for a few days to a week or so and generally throw them very well, then it all seems to level off to my normal game.   Same when I purchase new darts---take them out the box toss them a bit, fiddle with the set-up with different stems and flights, tweak them to fit my throw and toss more than average marks or darts for score.   After a week or so, it's back to normal.

My buddy I practice with several times a month purchased the Target Elysian darts for something like $425 US and he throws no better with them than he did when he played with his $40 darts.    Only now, it's going to cost him around $45 just for new stems for those darts.    So the moral of the story as far as I'm concerned is in agreement with many that have said price really doesn't matter.
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I like cheap Darts and generally won't go over £25 if I can help it. I'm only a casual player so don't worry too much about what other think. It's your money and you take your pick. If you hit the doubles who cares just enjoy the game.
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