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Practice and Statistics
I sporadically write a blog that is almost (but not quite) always about darts.  The one I have just done I thought might stir up either some good debate or universal condemnation  Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Darts Practice and Statistics.
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Good read +1 -

I think it's really a little bit of both though.  I almost always keep statistics when I practice.  The issue becomes when you are always trying to beat your personal best vs using the statistics to improve your stroke.

A good example is around the world doubles.  The program I use tracks your percentage on each double.  My goal is never solely to finish in a faster amount of turns than ever before, rather I use the stats to be objective on the targets I may need more practice on.  Sometimes what you "feel" and what is really happening can be vastly different and you only truly know this if you are able to look at your statistics.
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I think it makes good sense to me, practice is more about the journey than the final result. For me when I practice it is more important to repeat a good stroke and as less to accumulate high scores.
That way when I compete ( rarely these days ) the stroke is automatic and less considered leaving me to enjoy just playing.
Very thought provoking article.
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Playing 40 years on and off and still barely average
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Quote: the stroke is automatic and less considered leaving me to enjoy just playing.

Yes!!  That is what I strive for.  Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
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(12-20-2015, 06:48 PM)davidsproull Wrote: I sporadically write a blog that is almost (but not quite) always about darts.  The one I have just done I thought might stir up either some good debate or universal condemnation  Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Darts Practice and Statistics.

I guess I agree as I differentiate between the different types of practice that I do.  And by practice I mean "not playing competitively in the league or a competition".

For me there's several types of practice... 
  1. Throwing practice, where I'm consciously working on the mechanics of my throw.  Here I use something like A1 so there's no score keeping. 
  2. 'Feel' practice where I use things like Dorian's T20-T19-T18 game or Round The World doubles.  I don't want any pressure to hit the targets here so I'm not keeping score.  I just want to throw well and get the feeling of hitting doubles.
  3. Match practice.  This is practicing in a game-like situation against Pro Darter.  Here I want the pressure of performing against an opponent so I want statistics here.  I only want to use the stats after the game as a tool for tracking progress rather than in-game where I'm trying to "beat my record".  By that I mean that I don't want to know that I'm on a high PPT score part way through the game as it will change how I play.
I think that's what you're saying in the article:


Quote:You shouldn't need to eliminate practice games from your repretoire altogether, as they can be fun, just recognize the difference between practice and a practice game.  

Darts: Harrows Glen Durrant Duzza Series 2 24g, short Harrows Supergrip shafts, Harrows flights (Marathon/Retina/Optix/Rapide) 


Best 501: 13 darts (League), 14 darts (Pro Darter)

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(12-22-2015, 01:21 AM)Banz Wrote:
(12-20-2015, 06:48 PM)davidsproull Wrote: I sporadically write a blog that is almost (but not quite) always about darts.  The one I have just done I thought might stir up either some good debate or universal condemnation  Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Darts Practice and Statistics.

I guess I agree as I differentiate between the different types of practice that I do.  And by practice I mean "not playing competitively in the league or a competition".

For me there's several types of practice... 
  1. Throwing practice, where I'm consciously working on the mechanics of my throw.  Here I use something like A1 so there's no score keeping. 
  2. 'Feel' practice where I use things like Dorian's T20-T19-T18 game or Round The World doubles.  I don't want any pressure to hit the targets here so I'm not keeping score.  I just want to throw well and get the feeling of hitting doubles.
  3. Match practice.  This is practicing in a game-like situation against Pro Darter.  Here I want the pressure of performing against an opponent so I want statistics here.  I only want to use the stats after the game as a tool for tracking progress rather than in-game where I'm trying to "beat my record".  By that I mean that I don't want to know that I'm on a high PPT score part way through the game as it will change how I play.
I think that's what you're saying in the article:


Quote:You shouldn't need to eliminate practice games from your repretoire altogether, as they can be fun, just recognize the difference between practice and a practice game.  

I must say it is nice to see how many people here take advantage of Flight School.  I would say that you are on the right track with your thinking.
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Games are a real life demonstration of statistics. 

I believe that if keeping statistics in the home is harming your practice, you should learn how to do it.  After all, if it is difficult at home, it will be doubly difficult in competition when *your* statistics are displayed in competition on the chalk board.

As you know, the mental game is usually the dominant element.  Oh sure, you're technique can be so poor that no amount of confidence will overcome it, but let's assume that your technique is at least serviceable.  That being said, the mental game is largely about pressure management, which can be learned. ( I refuse to use the term control, because that in itself creates pressure. )

Managing pressure must be something you can practice at home.  Flight school does this by slowly ramping up the stress on the stroke as you increase the level of drills.  Flight school demands you keep score. 

I suggest that keeping statistics reveals your pressure management skills as well as your technical skills.  It also proves whether or not you are achieving your goals.  To address the notion in the blog that statistics make for competition, well, no.... keeping stats does not mean that the player is going to compete with his prior self.  That is an unhealthy form of keeping stats.  Keeping stats simply measures how the player did today.  

Many things can cause a bad day at the oche.  An argument with the wife, feeling low, illness, injury, a bad day at work.... your response to these elements says little about your skill level.  Even Phil Taylor is not immune to this: witness his exit at the worlds this year.  Phil cited life issues as the reason he failed in his quest for his 17th title.

Equally many things can cause a great day at the oche.... 

Statistics will show a general trend provided you are diligent and keep them long enough.  If you keep them every day, you will eventually get used to it.  That is a good thing. Sometimes, we do it without even knowing.  For example, everyone that has played with pro darter or n01 will see that the level of trainer they play against goes up over time.   Isn't that what we all want?  Of course we keep track of it.  You know it every time you use the program! 

Is there a time *not* to keep statistics? I think so.... this is when you are consciously adjusting some sort of element in your technique.  That should be done without fear of punishment... ie, without the spectre of the statistic showing your miserable first steps.  However, once you feel that what you are working on is stable, and you are happy with it,  then the first step to adding a bit of pressure to test its stability is to add statistics.

They are unavoidable and an integral part of the game.
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Good info. Thanks for the read.
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