Shot Darts

*Recognizing The Difference To Be A Better Player
Outshot selections are NOT set in stone. 

Part of improving as a player is to recognize when to switch up your outshots selections. I'm going to use the outshot 51 as an example because I have a video to go along with what I'm going to type. 

Let's pretend you have 51 left and a decent lead. You're up 3-1 in a best of 9 and the opponent is back on 234. If you want to go 19's to leave 32 it's a perfectly fine shot. You might prefer D16 and if that's the case there is nothing wrong with going that way. But just be aware that hitting the treble 19 will bust your score. It's rare but does happen. Still nothing wrong with the shot in this situation though. 

Now... Let's look at the same 51 outshot in a huge pressure situation. Again, pretend that the match is tied at 3-3 in a best of 7 and the opponent is sitting pretty with 40 left. Things are tense. Adrenaline is pumping and you desperately want to win. In this situation you want to avoid 19's like it's the  Black plague ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Death ) Seriously. Avoid that crap.  
The problem here is the risk of busting increases because of the massive amount of pressure involved in the match. Easy shots become very difficult. We've all seen it and done it. I know I've done it numerous times in my life. Even the pro's we see on the telly aren't immune. So, to avoid all that mess in this situation make sure you avoid the bust and go single 11, D20.  

Here's a quick video that most of us have seen regarding this scenario. Although none of us can predict the future, what we do know as fact is the match was 7-7 in a race to 9 legs. The player had 51 left and busted on dart #1. He lost the leg and would've had the throw in the next leg. 

What we could speculate... If the player threw at the 11 and hit it he would've had 2 clear darts at D20 to go up 8-7 with the start in the next leg which he ended up winning. A match he totally should've won 9-7. 

Let's have a look...   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zH0lmKIPxk


The same thing could be said about the outshots 50 and 52. If you insist on leaving 32 just make sure you know when to do it and when to NOT do it. No single outshot is set in stone. If you want to go 18's with 50 left it's a fine choice. Just make sure the match isn't hanging in the balance. 

Imagine playing in a league match against a team you hate. Your rivals. It's come down to the team match 701 and you have 52 left and they're waiting to check out 32. First dart you throw dead center of the treble 20 and bust! Then the other team takes out 32 and gives it large. Huge celebrations all over the place. Now your team is mad as hell at you and you feel crap. The "woulda" and "coulda's" run through your mind on your miserable ride home. Even your dog doesn't greet you because he senses you did something wrong. 

If you only went 12's with that 1st dart...

But seriously. Just make sure you know when to switch up outshots. Nothing is ever set in stone. But to advance your skill and become a better player you need to recognize when to take the less risky shot. Hope this helps... Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
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(10-20-2015, 04:33 PM)Cyanide Wrote: Outshot selections are NOT set in stone. 

Part of improving as a player is to recognize when to switch up your outshots selections. I'm going to use the outshot 51 as an example because I have a video to go along with what I'm going to type. 

Let's pretend you have 51 left and a decent lead. You're up 3-1 in a best of 9 and the opponent is back on 234. If you want to go 19's to leave 32 it's a perfectly fine shot. You might prefer D16 and if that's the case there is nothing wrong with going that way. But just be aware that hitting the treble 19 will bust your score. It's rare but does happen. Still nothing wrong with the shot in this situation though. 

Now... Let's look at the same 51 outshot in a huge pressure situation. Again, pretend that the match is tied at 3-3 in a best of 7 and the opponent is sitting pretty with 40 left. Things are tense. Adrenaline is pumping and you desperately want to win. In this situation you want to avoid 19's like it's the  Black plague ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Death ) Seriously. Avoid that crap.  
The problem here is the risk of busting increases because of the massive amount of pressure involved in the match. Easy shots become very difficult. We've all seen it and done it. I know I've done it numerous times in my life. Even the pro's we see on the telly aren't immune. So, to avoid all that mess in this situation make sure you avoid the bust and go single 11, D20.  

Here's a quick video that most of us have seen regarding this scenario. Although none of us can predict the future, what we do know as fact is the match was 7-7 in a race to 9 legs. The player had 51 left and busted on dart #1. He lost the leg and would've had the throw in the next leg. 

What we could speculate... If the player threw at the 11 and hit it he would've had 2 clear darts at D20 to go up 8-7 with the start in the next leg which he ended up winning. A match he totally should've won 9-7. 

Let's have a look...   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zH0lmKIPxk


The same thing could be said about the outshots 50 and 52. If you insist on leaving 32 just make sure you know when to do it and when to NOT do it. No single outshot is set in stone. If you want to go 18's with 50 left it's a fine choice. Just make sure the match isn't hanging in the balance. 

Imagine playing in a league match against a team you hate. Your rivals. It's come down to the team match 701 and you have 52 left and they're waiting to check out 32. First dart you throw dead center of the treble 20 and bust! Then the other team takes out 32 and gives it large. Huge celebrations all over the place. Now your team is mad as hell at you and you feel crap. The "woulda" and "coulda's" run through your mind on your miserable ride home. Even your dog doesn't greet you because he senses you did something wrong. 

If you only went 12's with that 1st dart...

But seriously. Just make sure you know when to switch up outshots. Nothing is ever set in stone. But to advance your skill and become a better player you need to recognize when to take the less risky shot. Hope this helps... Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Yup yup yup!  

Hand in hand here is knowing when to set up an out shot as opposed to taking one.  

You have  70 with two darts in hand.   S20-bull for an unknown result or S10-S20 to leave D20?   


Opponent is not on a finish: Set up D20.

Opponent on a finish that needs two triples to complete: Set up D20.

Opponent on a finish that needs just one triple? Set up D20.... unless your opponent can hit a triple on demand.  That would be a pro.

Opponent can get a clear shot at a double by setting up with two or fewer singles ( below 80 ) : S20-Bull.

Even here, there is wiggle room given the score in games.  The closer the opponent is to winning the match, the more sensible it may be to just attempt the S20-Bull outshot.
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Music 
This is a fantastic post. The triples never seem so big as they are when you just need a single. When I first started playing darts one of the best players in our league told me to let the single lead the way. Go for the single where the triple won't bust your score. Then he told me about a web site https://www.crowsdarts.com/dprosdoit.html . It's a long read but has all the outs and an explanation why it's a better way to go at it.
I'm just an average shooter in our league so I study strategy to maximize my chances to win. You can never have too many points in a cricket game and I don't care how far ahead you are in an '01 game, going the safe way to an out will benefit you in the long run.
Shoot well and often
Shoot well and often
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Another brilliant thread, and hopefully I'll be able to view the images now Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
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know thy skill level. my buddies look at me weird when i'm working on my outs because my math and my skills don't equate to theirs.
Darts: 18g softtip Monster Cobra 2BA, 260 LStyle Champagne Shafts, L3 Flights.
Other Darts: 18g softtip Monster Soldier No.5
Best out (soft tip): 106 (16, Bull, d20).

Darts Connect ID: 1000002362
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(12-17-2015, 12:14 AM)huckduck Wrote: know thy skill level. my buddies look at me weird when i'm working on my outs because my math and my skills don't equate to theirs.

I'd second this but add that practice (e.g. checkout-type drills, Pro Darter) is an excellent place to stretch yourself and expand your comfort zone. You'll never be able to do a switch to T17 if you don't practice it. And it's frustrating when a perceived lack of ability makes you stick with you favourite treble, which you then hit leaving yourself a "bad" double.

Darts: Harrows Glen Durrant Duzza Series 2 24g, short Harrows Supergrip shafts, Harrows flights (Marathon/Retina/Optix/Rapide) 


Best 501: 13 darts (League), 14 darts (Pro Darter)

Best Checkout: 154 (League), 160 (Pro Darter)
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You nailed it
Match Darts: Target Carrera C3 25g
Shafts: L-style carbon locked
Flights: L-style champagne shape C3 dimple

High in: 160 Matchplay / High out: 170 Matchplay
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Practicing skill should be distinguished from practicing for results. The former can be done on a non hostile drill format without reference to results..or perhaps better stated without reference to very high accuracy requirements.  Results though are all about high accuracy.  It is accuracy under pressure that can really trip you up.

What I mean is that people can throw remarkably well with no pressure. The challenge of taking their practice skills to the game is where we all falter. Computer play can give us more games. Drills with consequences can apply significant pressure. 

But ultimately its going to be about your confidence in your skills.  Banz is doing a great job tracking his skill development.  For sure without tracking it your  level of improvement is just a guess. Tracking is not competition. It's just recording how you did during your drills. As you improve your skills you should see improvement in task performance. But again...this is skill development. Learning how to track progress wit hout turning a drill into a competition is critical.  

You must not just do the drills, you need to learn how to train. That is something most folks never do. Banz has a good hold on this.
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(04-04-2016, 04:34 AM)BigE Wrote: Practicing skill should be distinguished from practicing for results. The former can be done on a non hostile drill format without reference to results..or perhaps better stated without reference to very high accuracy requirements.  Results though are all about high accuracy.  It is accuracy under pressure that can really trip you up.

What I mean is that people can throw remarkably well with no pressure. The challenge of taking their practice skills to the game is where we all falter. Computer play can give us more games. Drills with consequences can apply significant pressure. 

But ultimately its going to be about your confidence in your skills.  Banz is doing a great job tracking his skill development.  For sure without tracking it your  level of improvement is just a guess. Tracking is not competition. It's just recording how you did during your drills. As you improve your skills you should see improvement in task performance. But again...this is skill development. Learning how to track progress wit hout turning a drill into a competition is critical.  

You must not just do the drills, you need to learn how to train. That is something most folks never do. Banz has a good hold on this.

Agree. 

It is the biggest challenge, but it also affords the greatest rewards..
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(04-04-2016, 04:34 AM)BigE Wrote: Practicing skill should be distinguished from practicing for results. The former can be done on a non hostile drill format without reference to results..or perhaps better stated without reference to very high accuracy requirements.  Results though are all about high accuracy.  It is accuracy under pressure that can really trip you up.

What I mean is that people can throw remarkably well with no pressure. The challenge of taking their practice skills to the game is where we all falter. Computer play can give us more games. Drills with consequences can apply significant pressure. 

But ultimately its going to be about your confidence in your skills.  Banz is doing a great job tracking his skill development.  For sure without tracking it your  level of improvement is just a guess. Tracking is not competition. It's just recording how you did during your drills. As you improve your skills you should see improvement in task performance. But again...this is skill development. Learning how to track progress wit hout turning a drill into a competition is critical.  

You must not just do the drills, you need to learn how to train. That is something most folks never do. Banz has a good hold on this.


A player can develop all the skill in the world but if they're making poor choices in how they play it will have a great impact on their wins v losses.  I used to see it ALL the time when playing online darts. Great players with an unreal amount of skill but they go for odd shots and it ends up costing them the match. 

And I'm not talking about anything fancy here in this thread. The only thing a player needs to do is hit a single segment. But the key is to hit the right single at the right time. As I said in the first post, if a player doesn't recognize this then they can toss all their practice right out the window.
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some great points made here, opened my eyes!
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