Target Darts.

Carbon shaft too long
I have just purchased new carbon shafts and when I screw them into my darts there is a space between the dart and flat part of the shaft Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images. .   I have tried putting the small o-ring washer on the threads of the shaft. However, it is too thin and does not fit tight.

If I put 2 o-rings on the shaft to take up the extra space this causes the shaft to be at an angle when tightening it.  I did not think the o-rings should be used with this type of shaft but since the shafts do come loose after just a few throws I have to find a way of making them fit tight .

I was wondering if I should try sanding down the small section after the threads on the shaft since I can not and would not drill out the dart barrel.  Does anyone agree with sanding the shaft or have a better suggestion besides buying a different set of shafts as one of my teammates suggested?
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Sanding should work.

But I'm a little confused,there is even a gap with no o-rings?
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There is about a 1/8th inch section that extends from the treads and it is a smooth round part with flat bottom.  The threads do not go all the way to the bottom of the shaft.

Just look up "L Style Shaft Carbon Silent Straight Dart Shaft X Short Clear Black" and you can see the bottom part with no threads.

I am guessing the dart barrel was not drilled out enough or the shaft is just a little too long because when I match it up to other plastic shafts that bottom part is a little longer by looks but I can not measure it to be exactly sure. If I put a plastic shaft on the dart it tightens up.  However, I can put this carbon shaft on a different set of darts but they have a very much deeper drilled out back end so it does not hit the inside at all and tightens up as it should.

I was just wondering if the sanding could cause any other problems with the shafts.  The gap is a little more then the thickness of an o-ring so it would be a considerable amount of sanding.  Unless someone has a different way of solving this problem.
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Sanding will work fine, Trekbowl. Just treat it like a human fingernail - you don't want to leave any 'cracks' in the sanding that could cause it to split. In that respect, running it with a 300 - 400 grit, then a 800-1000 to finish should be more than adequate.

Alternatively, you could use a cheap MIC medium/fine grit sharpening stone with running water like this: https://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41eC4CGczRL.jpg  Same principle as above.

All the best.  Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
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Just to let you all know I was able to sand down the end of the shaft to make it fit the dart barrel.  It took 50+ six inch passes on a 100 grit sandpaper to get it to where it would fit and lock into the barrel.

It was very close to the threads so I just took my time and finished with three or more passes on a 400 grit paper to take off any roughness.  Now the shafts fit tight and I just hope they work better because they appear to be straighter now since the o-ring is not needed.
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(10-21-2015, 10:08 PM)trekbowl300 Wrote: Just to let you all know I was able to sand down the end of the shaft to make it fit the dart barrel.  It took 50+ six inch passes on a 100 grit sandpaper to get it to where it would fit and lock into the barrel.

It was very close to the threads so I just took my time and finished with three or more passes on a 400 grit paper to take off any roughness.  Now the shafts fit tight and I just hope they work better because they appear to be straighter now since the o-ring is not needed.

They're all the same length too?
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They appear to be all the same length near the threads about a 1/32nd of an inch away very close.  I figured as long as they fit into the barrel and I can tighten the flat part of the shaft against the end of the barrel with no gap that should be good enough.  

I did not change anything from the flight side of that flat mounting surface on the shaft where it touches the barrel so that should be the same length.  

I don't think there would be enough of a difference after sanding that weight could affect anything, as far as length the flat stop part of the shaft is against the barrel whereas before it was a little more then the thickness of an o-ring away.  At that time they did screw in at different lengths because one would hit the inside of the barrel before another one would, which made them different and not tighten up all that well.
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I have noticed lately people have darts that the shafts don't screw in all the way. Some mfg have not drilled threaded deep enough or mfg of shafts have not compisated for the darts. I believe that there should be a standard for this problem and then there would not be any issues with this. Just saying
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Is this what you mean? The threads are too long? As someone who has packed tungsten putty into the back of their darts I've noticed this with Cosmo stems. The thread section is wicked long! Takes up all the room in the back of my dart. Look at it compared to a Target stem.  I've sanded down the clear stems.
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(10-23-2015, 08:49 PM)Cyanide Wrote: Is this what you mean? The threads are too long? As someone who has packed tungsten putty into the back of their darts I've noticed this with Cosmo stems. The thread section is wicked long! Takes up all the room in the back of my dart. Look at it compared to a Target stem.  I've sanded down the clear stems.

Notice that the Japanese stems tend to be the longest, while the UK made ones are short, and rarely, medium.
The Japanese manufacturers didn't think of padded-up dart barrels and their barrels generally have more than enough space drilled in. From what I can tell, most Japanese stems will fit UK barrels with the exception of some barrels.

The danger of shortening stems too much, if you really filled the hollow up with putty or other materials, is more tendencies to  break off on bounce-outs on hard surfaces. It doesn't happen often, or perhaps I would say hardly, but it can. Rule of thumb - depth being longer than the diameter of the thread.
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The pictures show exactly what I was saying.  Look at the clear and black stems.  The small section extending after the threads is what I sanded off to make it look like the blue stem.

The shaft I have is an L-style silent carbon so I am guessing the bottom with the threads is plastic and the top spinning part is the carbon.  So I sanded off just the bottom plastic extension so it fit into my dart which did not have very much drilled out of it pass the threads.

The drilled out part is another interesting item in itself since I have two sets of the same darts which are supposed to be the same weight, yet the stems fit in with no problem on my older set of darts.  However, the set I am using now a newer set, I had to sand off that piece to get the stems to fit. So the dart manufacturer made the darts different (I wish I had a scale now to check the weight) causing this problem or is it the other way around the stems are just too long.  Don't know but they fit now so I can use them.
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