Harrows Darts.

Off the oche for new insight.
I'm sure most people have tried stepping back a few feet off the oche and seeing how they do at more of a distance. I have a 24" stool about three feet behind my oche where I sit while I let my scorer shoot. It allows a more realistic pace. For the heck of it, I tried throwing from a sideways sitting position from back there and learned a few things. One, the extra distance allows errors in throwing form more time to play out and you can see the subtle effects more easily. Two, I really had to throw hard and follow through to get the dart up to the treble 20. I really showed me what my stroke is about. But then, I started snatching. And this is where I realized what snatching is all about. It is about power. I found a quick flip and snatch made it way easier to get the dart to the top of the board. What happens is that you can accelerate the dart faster with a shorter stroke. You simply can not keep up the pace of acceleration through the entire stroke, so you jerk you hand back to keep from slowing the dart down. Now that I know why my brain subconsciously keeps tricking me into snatching, I can have more confidence with a more consistent follow through and prevent it. I am just wondering what others might have to say about this.
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Thunk, thunk, thunk, walk, chalk, pull, turn, walk, turn, repeat...

Reply
I tried a couple of years ago throwing from 9 feet like the old timers, my darts barely reached the board and landed at the bottom.
Subscribe to Darts Review Channel here: Darts Review Channel on Youtube

Click to visit Darts Review Channel website

My darts collection:
Flickr Album

Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.
Reply
If your darts are hitting with the flights to the left or right consistently, you probably have a wobble. The dart wobbles pretty quickly as it flies. If you stand back a smidge at a time, you'll come to where the dart hits at the part of the wobble where it lands with the flights at 90 degrees. Use this as a tool in correcting your wobble, moving up as you correct. Things to correct might be too many fingers on the dart, hand position or excessive chicken winging. Worked for me
I do all my own stunts.
Reply
(01-21-2015, 06:35 PM)vintageray Wrote: If your darts are hitting with the flights to the left or right consistently, you probably have a wobble. The dart wobbles pretty quickly as it flies. If you stand back a smidge at a time, you'll come to where the dart hits at the part of the wobble where it lands with the flights at 90 degrees. Use this as a tool in correcting your wobble, moving up as you correct. Things to correct might be too many fingers on the dart, hand position or excessive chicken winging. Worked for me

I have struggled with wobble all year, but mostly have that issue resolved. Now, my struggle is more about maintaining my follow through. The extra force required from a sitting position 3 feet back really gave me insight into my swing. But the biggest insight I derived from this exercise is what a snatch is all about and why our brains try to get us to do it.

I set up a camera yesterday in another exercise to analyze my form. Wow. Your throw never looks like what you imagine it to be. I observed that while my arm was traveling to maximum extension, my hand would strike a different pose most of the time. Sometimes it fold over proper and sometimes my fingers would pop open spread eagle.

The ultimate goal; a repeatable relaxed wobble free throw with the fullest extension my twice broken elbow can accomplish. I think these kind of exercises are good for those who are still in search of their throw, but a waste of time for someone who already has the throw and wants to keep it in tune for their next competition.
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Thunk, thunk, thunk, walk, chalk, pull, turn, walk, turn, repeat...

Reply
It is not about power for me. It is about trying to do something with the dart that it cannot do.... like push it underneath another, or just pop it above another. Why not just repeat the last shot? Why not add a little more wrist snap or finger involvement?

No, instead, I will attempt to release the dart without either wrist or finger movement. Going higher by not snapping the wrist down.... as if that will make the dart go up!

In short, the snatch is an attempted finesse move that fails miserably.

Think about it... if every tight grouping was the result of a dart thrown and two finesse moves, how many do you think you'd get?
Reply
(05-23-2015, 02:05 PM)BigE Wrote: It is not about power for me. It is about trying to do something with the dart that it cannot do.... like push it underneath another, or just pop it above another. Why not just repeat the last shot? Why not add a little more wrist snap or finger involvement?

No, instead, I will attempt to release the dart without either wrist or finger movement. Going higher by not snapping the wrist down.... as if that will make the dart go up!

In short, the snatch is an attempted finesse move that fails miserably.

Think about it... if every tight grouping was the result of a dart thrown and two finesse moves, how many do you think you'd get?

I agree completely. Since I posted this thread a while back, I have been through another finessing mess. My grip rested the barrel on my middle finger, (ala Phil Taylor). I realized I had started adding a little flick with that finger upon release. I would try not to do it, but it would sneak back in. A little attempt at finessing. I figure that middle finger was just flipping me off. So, you won't let me snatch? I'll show you! And then it happened. I tried a different grip (kinda like getagrip). I moved from the back of the barrel to the front and now rest that cursed bugger finger on to the top of the point. Problem solved. So many finger interactions are now eliminated. It feels so natural and right that I have not looked back, even for a second. And it has been a couple of weeks. I have turned a corner. My stroke is becoming grooved like it hasn't ever been. My groupings are WAY better, and I feel like I can hit what I want. Of course I can't, I need to continue putting in the long hours. I need to run my routines and not just play solitary games. I need to get out (as I did the other night) and compete against people better than me. I think it is necessary for beginner players to try things. They have to work them out. It takes time and dedication. Every avenue you try is one less you will need to try in the future. It really feels good to experience an improvement that is noticeable and still working the next day after the Guinness has worn off.
Guests cannot see images in the messages. Please register at the forum by clicking here to see images.

Thunk, thunk, thunk, walk, chalk, pull, turn, walk, turn, repeat...

Reply
Congratulations!!!

I wish I had it so easy.... my stroke has some seriously off-centered wrist action. It is not inline with the main stroke of the arm. Arm tilts forwards, but wrist moves across. That sprays darts from left to right and back again. When it is noticed, the wrist sometimes jams to stop it's progress from left to right....and the throw feels like doing shot put.

Nasty.

I can only think of straightening out the follow through so that the pull back becomes more efficient.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)
Loxley Darts.