This might sound daft, but... How are 'best of' games calculated with sets and legs?
Hi. I have a few questions about calculating the general scoring of games, if I may.

I understand how a best of game works with just legs. If it were best of 9, it is effectively the same as first to 5, or in maths terms:

Where n is the pre-determined number of legs, and x is the winning leg - If n is odd, x = (n + 1) / 2

That brings me on to my first question, does anyone ever play best of games where n is even? I realise that could result in a tie, I'm just curious whether it's ever an option in professional scenarios where games are ultimately won on an aggregated points decision elsewhere? Or perhaps when you're just playing a casual game down the pub with a friend and you're happy for it to be a tie, if it comes to it?

Anyway, my real confusion lies when sets are also factored in. Say you're playing "best of 5 sets". Is it normal to state how many legs are required to win a set? Or is it always a fixed number?

For example, would you clarify "best of 5 sets" with "5 legs required per set"? Or would you just say "best of 5 sets" and it is a given that to win a set, a player has to win a known, fixed number of legs? That is, "5 legs required per set" isn't even a thing, it is ALWAYS 3 legs to win a set, for example?

I've been trying to work this out for myself, but the trouble is, when you search for professional dart matches on YouTube and include "best of", you inevitably get "Here's the best of 2019 games" instead of matches that are scored using "best of".

If there is a rule, that when sets are used, there is always a fixed number of legs required to win a set, I presume the same number applies to "first to" games when sets are also involved?

Essentially, if there isn't always a fixed number of legs to win a set... In a best of scenario, would the number of legs required to win a set also be calculated using "best of"?

For example, if "Best of 5 sets, 9 legs" is a valid game, would you take that to mean "a player has to win 9 legs to win a set", or, "a player has to win the best of 9 legs to win a set", i.e. the player would have to win 5 legs to take a set, in this scenario?

Sorry to sound like a totally amateur here, I hope that all made sense!

Thank you very much Smile
Reply
In professional darts the premier league is a good example of where there are draws but it isn't set play its simply best of 12 so 7 can win it but 6-6 is a draw.

As regards the rest of your post, I would expect most players would say to win a set you require 3 legs or where it is a deciding set there may be some sudden death rules. Regardless of level being played the individual competition will explicity state the format so I can't see any scenario where you would be told its best of sets and not also told how many legs to win a set. Most local darts leagues near me are a single set, best of 3 so first to 2 wins. This goes up the higher up the divisions you go but everywhere is different.

I don't think you will ever be left wondering how many legs are needed to win a set, to take your last example a best of 5 sets game with 9 legs required to win a set would go on for hours! So very unlikely to ever happen like that. Even first to 5 legs would be a very odd format, if the pros don't play like that then amateurs definitely shouldn't! Big Grin
Reply
(03-05-2020, 09:53 PM)Ivefoundgod Wrote: In professional darts the premier league is a good example of where there are draws but it isn't set play its simply best of 12 so 7 can win it but 6-6 is a draw.

As regards the rest of your post, I would expect most players would say to win a set you require 3 legs or where it is a deciding set there may be some sudden death rules. Regardless of level being played the individual competition will explicity state the format so I can't see any scenario where you would be told its best of sets and not also told how many legs to win a set. Most local darts leagues near me are a single set, best of 3 so first to 2 wins. This goes up the higher up the divisions you go but everywhere is different.

I don't think you will ever be left wondering how many legs are needed to win a set, to take your last example a best of 5 sets game with 9 legs required to win a set would go on for hours! So very unlikely to ever happen like that. Even first to 5 legs would be a very odd format, if the pros don't play like that then amateurs definitely shouldn't! Big Grin

Thank you very much, the main reason I ask is because I'm making an app, so want to make sure I get everything right. Since they'll be able to select any number of sets/legs, i just wanted to make sure that everything would be correct even if they select something extreme, like in the example that would take forever lol. I already thought I knew the rules but I was watching a game earlier which was first to 7. It made no mention of how many legs were required. Lewis took a set after winning the 3rd leg, Anderson was on 1 leg. It was this that made me doubt myself, hence ask this question. For a minute I thought that perhaps it is always supposed to be 3 legs per set. But anyway, thank you again, that has cleared everything up for me Smile
Reply
No problem. That sounds like you were watching one of the World Championships, the final is first to 7 sets. Each set is best of 5 so first to 3. I think all pro formats are a set=best of 5.
Reply
(03-05-2020, 10:27 PM)Ivefoundgod Wrote: No problem. That sounds like you were watching one of the World Championships, the final is first to 7 sets. Each set is best of 5 so first to 3. I think all pro formats are a set=best of 5.

Ahh I see, thanks. And yes, it was Lewis v Anderson World Darts Championship 2011 Smile
Reply


Possibly Related Threads…
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  sound mechanics vs. instincts dilemna jamman 15 761 03-12-2019, 07:00 PM
Last Post: longgunshooterzero
  Big games Good fun games poor LesWallace180 10 1,369 01-12-2016, 08:34 AM
Last Post: LesWallace180



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)