Practice Board with smaller beds?
Who makes a bristle board with 1/2 sized doubles and triple beds? 20+ years ago I had a board with really small beds and thought it was called a "Championship Board" searching on that returns a billion results.

Do any of you know if these are still available?
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Hi,
Winmau make one with half size trebles and doubles ..... and as in my opinion they are the best boards anyway you can’t go wrong!!!
Hope it helps
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Still available, just search for "training dartboard". Should get plenty of good hits. Personally, I wouldn't use one of these unless it was for short sessions. So you need a regular board as well.

cheers...
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Most of the big companies make one - Winmau, Unicorn, Bulls, One80 to name a few.

They are typically called a Trainer Board.
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IMHO this type of board is a complete waste of money unless you want endless frustrating hours trying to overcome the reduced thicknesses of the double and treble and bull areas.

I don’t believe there is any empirical evidence to suggest that dart players actually benefit from using these training boards other than perhaps a phsychological belief that if they can hit the target they’re going to be a champion player on a regular board.

As with most sports you will no doubt find suppliers offering snake oils and wonderful novelty devices aimed at providing players a short cut to greatness.

There has been only 2 real improvements to the game that have had clear advantages to players as the sport evolved .... tungsten and staple free spiders, lighting with led helps but it won’t make you automatically a better player.

Cheers
Dorian
Son of Merlin

Caerleon - Wales

(Monster "Milkman" - 22.4Gm, Smooth Gold Points 36mm, Yellow Kite Shape Flights 100 micron & Solid Brass Stems)

[Image: 0mbrxgh.png]

My father Merlin, once told me that "You should end up pointing to what you were aiming at when you've released the Dart."




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(03-11-2019, 08:39 PM)Papa w Wrote: Hi,
Winmau make one with half size trebles and doubles ..... and as in my opinion they are the best boards anyway  you can’t go wrong!!!
Hope it helps

Thanks Papa W. How'd you get to be a pili nut? I've actually invested in a few pili farmers in the Philippines!

I happen to believe the old adage "Aim small, miss small" so will be seeking out a winmau practice board.
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(03-11-2019, 08:56 PM)Dorian Wrote: IMHO this type of board is a complete waste of money unless you want endless frustrating hours trying to overcome the reduced thicknesses of the double and treble and bull areas.

I don’t believe there is any empirical evidence to suggest that dart players actually benefit from using these training boards other than perhaps a phsychological belief that if they can hit the target they’re going to be a champion player on a regular board.

As with most sports you will no doubt find suppliers offering snake oils and wonderful novelty devices aimed at providing players a short cut to greatness.

There has been only 2 real improvements to the game that have had clear advantages to players as the sport evolved .... tungsten and staple free spiders, lighting with led helps but it won’t make you automatically a better player.

Cheers

I agree in general. If you want to improve, the best you can do is stick to a regular board. The most efficient practice you can get is simulating a competitive environment as much as you can. I don't know of too many professionals who use these training boards and I can see why. Throwing from a longer distance also makes darts more challenging, yet you don't see a single serious player throwing from 9 feet, just to make practice harder.

But I would point out that if you are doing it for fun, play on a training board once a week or something like that, then it's fine, just to make that practice routine a bit more exciting. If that's what you like, go ahead IMO
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After purchasing and practicing on a Bulls advantage trainer board, I have to admit that it doesn't really help your game to train with smaller segments. Yes, the 'aim small, miss small' line applies here and after awhile I got about the same amount of trebles and near misses as on a regular board. But it is a mistake to think that all those near misses would be trebles on a regular board. You are still aiming at the treble bed, doesn't matter how big. Aiming at a smaller target within the treble bed, for instance a rough patch or a dot, would increase your accuracy.
Then again, I still put up the old trainer board once and a while because I just love the way the trebles on a regular board look so much bigger after switching back.
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(03-11-2019, 09:26 PM)Phenohyte Wrote:
(03-11-2019, 08:56 PM)Dorian Wrote: IMHO this type of board is a complete waste of money unless you want endless frustrating hours trying to overcome the reduced thicknesses of the double and treble and bull areas.

I don’t believe there is any empirical evidence to suggest that dart players actually benefit from using these training boards other than perhaps a phsychological belief that if they can hit the target they’re going to be a champion player on a regular board.

As with most sports you will no doubt find suppliers offering snake oils and wonderful novelty devices aimed at providing players a short cut to greatness.

There has been only 2 real improvements to the game that have had clear advantages to players as the sport evolved .... tungsten and staple free spiders, lighting with led helps but it won’t make you automatically a better player.

Cheers

I agree in general. If you want to improve, the best you can do is stick to a regular board. The most efficient practice you can get is simulating a competitive environment as much as you can. I don't know of too many professionals who use these training boards and I can see why. Throwing from a longer distance also makes darts more challenging, yet you don't see a single serious player throwing from 9 feet, just to make practice harder.

But I would point out that if you are doing it for fun, play on a training board once a week or something like that, then it's fine, just to make that practice routine a bit more exciting. If that's what you like, go ahead IMO

As a steel darter I found the games played on electric dartboards really boring because they were so easy. Do you suppose the fact that we were throwing at smaller targets made us that much better? This was way back when Pubtime was getting their machines into the bars in the States and our steel team was cleaning up in tournaments run by vending machine operators.
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(03-11-2019, 09:54 PM)americanhelper Wrote:
(03-11-2019, 09:26 PM)Phenohyte Wrote:
(03-11-2019, 08:56 PM)Dorian Wrote: IMHO this type of board is a complete waste of money unless you want endless frustrating hours trying to overcome the reduced thicknesses of the double and treble and bull areas.

I don’t believe there is any empirical evidence to suggest that dart players actually benefit from using these training boards other than perhaps a phsychological belief that if they can hit the target they’re going to be a champion player on a regular board.

As with most sports you will no doubt find suppliers offering snake oils and wonderful novelty devices aimed at providing players a short cut to greatness.

There has been only 2 real improvements to the game that have had clear advantages to players as the sport evolved .... tungsten and staple free spiders, lighting with led helps but it won’t make you automatically a better player.

Cheers

I agree in general. If you want to improve, the best you can do is stick to a regular board. The most efficient practice you can get is simulating a competitive environment as much as you can. I don't know of too many professionals who use these training boards and I can see why. Throwing from a longer distance also makes darts more challenging, yet you don't see a single serious player throwing from 9 feet, just to make practice harder.

But I would point out that if you are doing it for fun, play on a training board once a week or something like that, then it's fine, just to make that practice routine a bit more exciting. If that's what you like, go ahead IMO

As a steel darter I found the games played on electric dartboards really boring because they were so easy. Do you suppose the fact that we were throwing at smaller targets made us that much better? This was way back when Pubtime was getting their machines into the bars in the States and our steel team was cleaning up in tournaments run by vending machine operators.
[quote pid='549115' dateline='1552337643']


At last someone who tells it as it is....well said and absolutely spot on!

Soft tip darts belongs in an amusement park with all lights flashing and bells and whistles sounding off.

regards

Dorian
[/quote]
Dorian
Son of Merlin

Caerleon - Wales

(Monster "Milkman" - 22.4Gm, Smooth Gold Points 36mm, Yellow Kite Shape Flights 100 micron & Solid Brass Stems)

[Image: 0mbrxgh.png]

My father Merlin, once told me that "You should end up pointing to what you were aiming at when you've released the Dart."




Reply


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