Zero consistency...actually getting worse
Yours is a stereotypical “starting out” story and in the early 90’s, mine was much the same.   Welcome to the club.   Just FYI... if you “first started a few weeks ago”, you definitely haven’t yet “put in a lot of practice time”.   You need to widen and deepen your perspective.   When you’ve practiced for 45-60 minutes/day for a year or two, you’ll see what I mean.   For almost all of us ordinary mortals, improving accuracy and consistency comes only as a result of lots of practice over an extended period of time.  

Keep on practicing and try using structured practice drills.   Take a look at the Flight School info here @ DNF.   It’ll get you started.  

On your trouble doubling in...   I had that same problem--and sometimes still do.   My personal solution to that problem was to work on doubling in with the 6 or 11.   It always seemed that I had better horizontal control over dart placement than vertical control, so I found the 6 and 11 to be more forgiving for me and a better way for me to get my game started more quickly.  

Good luck with developing your game.
Reply
I find when I practice I'm always trying to figure out how to get better, change my stance, my throw and it only gets worse, if i play a game with someone part of my brain goes on autopilot and I just shoot and that seems to workout much better.
Reply
(02-14-2019, 11:36 PM)RobJon Wrote: I find when I practice I'm always trying to figure out how to get better, change my stance, my throw and it only gets worse, if i play a game with someone part of my brain goes on autopilot and I just shoot and that seems to workout much better.
My experience was that using the same stance was important in developing consistency--just like using an unchanging stroke, release and follow-through.   Trying to figure out how to get better is good, but IMO not so when I’m actually shooting.   If I try to keep on thinking while I’m shooting, my shooting and everything else all goes to hell.   I shoot my best when I clear my mind as I step up to the oche, focus and concentrate on the dart in my hand, the target I want it to hit and connecting the two.

Competition is excellent and it’s what the game is all about, but IMO developing the accuracy and consistency that win games and matches is dependent on many hours of regular, structured practice over a long period of time.   Besides--if you just got sick of some dumb TV show or you need a short, quick escape from whatever...  you can always put in a quick 10, 20 or 30 minutes on the board.   You can’t conjure up an opponent and do any quick competition like that---unless you shoot against your wife or GF or roommate, and that person might very possibly what you need the short escape from.
Reply
I've had this many times, we all find our way of dealing with it differently.

Firstly, only practice when you want to practice. Don't think 'ok I'm playing bad at the moment, I need to get some form back', then go on the board and make it worse.

I usually put my darts down and walk away, I take a few days off. Some people fight through it, I've never done this. Sometimes I change my darts setup to psychologically feel as if I'm starting from fresh.

As I said above, we all have our own ways and you'll find your own way of dealing with it. My last piece of advice I can give is don't think about it, practice whilst listening to music or with the television. Have a distraction method than takes your mind off things. It could go the opposite way and distract your concentration or it could make you more relaxed and throw to enjoy it instead of taking it seriously.

As the saying goes - form is temporary, class is permanent. If it's there fella, it'll come.
Darts:
Target Carrera C5 (23g)
Target Pro Grip Clear Short Stems
Target Vision Fade Black Punched Flights 
Target Titanium Slot Lock Rings
Target Storm Nano Grip Black 26mm Points

Setup:
Unicorn Eclipse HD2 Pro Edition Board
Unicorn Striker Black Surround
Target Corona Vision Light System

180's: 
2019: 56
2018: 27



Reply
Apologies if I'm responding to a thread that is too old, but this one is a topic I'm struggling with myself.  And I very much appreciate the thoughts and input from everyone who responded - many very good points (no pun intended)!

Also, apologies as I'm not an expert in medicine or darts so these are only my opinions Smile

Unlike the poster of this thread, I used to play quite a bit in my younger years, took a long break (17 years or so), and just started throwing again within the past few weeks.  And I am awful!  But that's ok - I am fairly sure I will not be winning any tournaments any time soon, but I'm also fairly sure I will improve a lot over the next few months.

However, and like the poster of this thread, at the moment it seems like the more I practice the worse I get in terms of consistency.

I think there are a few factors here, some of which others have already commented on.

1) A few weeks is not really enough time to stabilize mentally.
2) In my case, my body is very much out of shape and although I'm not "sore" from throwing (I was for the first few days, but that's long gone now), my body is still adjusting to regular throwing.  Let's also remember that it's not just muscles being sore per se, but also muscle endurance and possibly most notably other connective tissue (tendons, ligaments, joints).  Also, as one area of the throwing arm stabilizes/strengthens, it may put more stress on another area that is now the weak point in the system, so the "gremlins" in the throw will likely move around as the body adapts (muscles being the fastest to adapt, ligaments being the slowest).  I expect it will be probably 3-6 months of routine practice before I'm relatively stable in this regard.
3) I am still (re) developing my throwing style, including how I stand, how I hold the dart, and how I throw.  This involves some experimentation, but even if/when I do commit to specific nuances of my own personal throwing style, they still are going to go in and out of consistency as I mentally stablize and muscle memory becomes more cemented.
4) Pace of throwing and practice is a big factor.  I find that I need to warm up, and then I can throw fairly well, but I am still working on endurance - not that I feel tired, and not that my arm hurts, but as I throw more than 5-10 minutes, my throwing consistency declines greatly.  I'm still working on this and I expect that as I continue to practice each night (far more on weekends when I'm not at work) that I will see great improvement, but I don't expect this to be linear.  
5) Often times, when cleaning up a room, you have to make it messier first.  Pull everything out before you can organize it again.  Clutter it up before you can clean it up.  I think the same is true with one's throwing when one is first starting out.  So I suppose I'm also suggesting that the entire process of developing one's throw is not at all steady in progress, but rather a very dramatic up-and-down in terms of day to day (or even week to week) progress.  Plateaus, slumps, and bursts of progress are part of darts even for those who have played many years straight, but I think this is especially erratic for beginning throwers.

So although I am more awful each time I practice and the more I practice the worse I get, I'm ok with that for now.  I have faith (perhaps based on other athletic and physical endeavors I've undertaken in the past) that although it doesn't seem like it, I am indeed making progress.  Just not in a linear fashion right now, haha.  And I'm having fun!
Reply
(03-16-2019, 07:20 PM)TryingToBeEgbert Wrote: Apologies if I'm responding to a thread that is too old, but this one is a topic I'm struggling with myself.  And I very much appreciate the thoughts and input from everyone who responded - many very good points (no pun intended)!

Also, apologies as I'm not an expert in medicine or darts so these are only my opinions Smile

Unlike the poster of this thread, I used to play quite a bit in my younger years, took a long break (17 years or so), and just started throwing again within the past few weeks.  And I am awful!  But that's ok - I am fairly sure I will not be winning any tournaments any time soon, but I'm also fairly sure I will improve a lot over the next few months.

However, and like the poster of this thread, at the moment it seems like the more I practice the worse I get in terms of consistency.

I think there are a few factors here, some of which others have already commented on.

1) A few weeks is not really enough time to stabilize mentally.
2) In my case, my body is very much out of shape and although I'm not "sore" from throwing (I was for the first few days, but that's long gone now), my body is still adjusting to regular throwing.  Let's also remember that it's not just muscles being sore per se, but also muscle endurance and possibly most notably other connective tissue (tendons, ligaments, joints).  Also, as one area of the throwing arm stabilizes/strengthens, it may put more stress on another area that is now the weak point in the system, so the "gremlins" in the throw will likely move around as the body adapts (muscles being the fastest to adapt, ligaments being the slowest).  I expect it will be probably 3-6 months of routine practice before I'm relatively stable in this regard.
3) I am still (re) developing my throwing style, including how I stand, how I hold the dart, and how I throw.  This involves some experimentation, but even if/when I do commit to specific nuances of my own personal throwing style, they still are going to go in and out of consistency as I mentally stablize and muscle memory becomes more cemented.
4) Pace of throwing and practice is a big factor.  I find that I need to warm up, and then I can throw fairly well, but I am still working on endurance - not that I feel tired, and not that my arm hurts, but as I throw more than 5-10 minutes, my throwing consistency declines greatly.  I'm still working on this and I expect that as I continue to practice each night (far more on weekends when I'm not at work) that I will see great improvement, but I don't expect this to be linear.  
5) Often times, when cleaning up a room, you have to make it messier first.  Pull everything out before you can organize it again.  Clutter it up before you can clean it up.  I think the same is true with one's throwing when one is first starting out.  So I suppose I'm also suggesting that the entire process of developing one's throw is not at all steady in progress, but rather a very dramatic up-and-down in terms of day to day (or even week to week) progress.  Plateaus, slumps, and bursts of progress are part of darts even for those who have played many years straight, but I think this is especially erratic for beginning throwers.

So although I am more awful each time I practice and the more I practice the worse I get, I'm ok with that for now.  I have faith (perhaps based on other athletic and physical endeavors I've undertaken in the past) that although it doesn't seem like it, I am indeed making progress.  Just not in a linear fashion right now, haha.  And I'm having fun!

Great post, and a very good summary of the life of a beginner / someone returning to Darts after a long time out of the game Smile
B: 21g   S: Intermediate   F: Shape   180s: 2
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Help with consistency in grip/release Neotenix 6 750 05-30-2018, 07:04 AM
Last Post: Mick Dundee
  Help with Grip consistency and Aim EasyStreitt 13 1,945 05-04-2018, 04:05 AM
Last Post: Evan Ebersole



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)