checkout table
(04-24-2018, 06:50 AM)Mindyereyes Wrote: It makes it so much easier to remember the checkouts when you understand the logic of why & when to go a particular route.

second this!
Reply
The best way how to learn outs is to practice these outs. I'd recommend practicing games like Catch 40 or finishing 170 in 9 or 12 or whatever number of darts you want. If you have some apps with similar games like this then use it, if you don't, look at my sig and download some of my own excels. You can find the Catch 40 game in my Darts Decider, or you can find some other games in the 170 in 9 darts and other routines spreadsheet.

Mind that the basics is to know outs from 100 down. If you know how to finish 83, then you would know how to finish a score 143 either because it's just 83 + 60 etc. (there are exceptions though...). Also, I've been playing darts for 20 years, I have finished every possible checkout at least once, and I know the whole logic of it, however even now I am open to new ideas how to finish certain scores. E.g. I have finished 152 numerous times with T20, T20, D16 and then I see someone else to finish it with T19, T19, D19 and it's moments like this when you realise there is a lot more nice ways how to finish legs even though it's more risky.

Talking about number of ways how to finish the leg, have you ever think of how many ways there is just for hitting a 9 darter? Don't even try to count it :-) You better google it. You might be surprised.

Anyway, if you know all pros and cons of every route then it's up to you if you choose some unusual ones now and then. For a starter I'd follow the tables like the one by Richard Ashdown.
Reply
(04-24-2018, 11:11 AM)copigme Wrote: Of course the best way to memorize is to play those numbers.
One of the first things I learn when i started playing darts was the finishing routes. I find that this is the easiest thing in darts (but it was easier for me because beeing a physicist made me good with numbers)

My personal advice is this.
You have to understand that despite the fact that all the doubles are the same size, the prefered doubles are mainly D20, D16, D8, D18 and D12. So when you have a chechout below 100 you have to think which treble will leave you the prefered double.
I learn those routes while driving my car, sitting in the bus or waiting in a bank line. 
Just take it from the beggining and think: If i have 3 left what should i do? 1, D1.
If i have 5 left? 1, D2 ...... and so on until the 170. When you can answer to the what should i do question, without thinking you are ready.

Advice 2: Always think what the missing treble is leaving you and be prepared to answer to yourself the what should i do question
129? what should i do? t20 19 BULL? if i miss the first treble? 109 left is not chachable with two darts? is there any way to have more chances? What if i go for t19 first? If i miss the first treble it leaves me 110 - T20 BULL.

So take it step by step. It cannot be like the history lesson in school that you have to memorize. It should be understaning and learning.
Fist the small numbers and then all the others.

Sorry for my long answer

Do not memorize  - LEARN
those are some very useful tips. thanks very much for sharing. i totally agree with you. learning is the way to go.
Reply
(04-24-2018, 03:30 PM)1double1 Wrote: those are some very useful tips. thanks very much for sharing. i totally agree with you. learning is the way to go.

It is, absolutely.  But you don't need to learn ALL the outshots.  You only need to learn 3-100 and you know them all up to 170.  Why?  Because the higher outshots only (!) require you to hit a treble to get down to a 2-dart out, and guess what - the 2 dart outs are all between 3 and 100. I would also suggest that you pay particular attention to the #s where the routes change when you have 2 or 3 darts in hand.  However, if you're just starting I would not concern yourself with the correct way to go on outs such as 122 or 127 etc just yet, the reasoning behind them will become obvious once you get the 2 dart outs figured out.

As everyone on the forum knows by now my attitude towards outshots is practise, practise, thinking, practise, think some more, practise. Blush   And when you think you've done enough thinking and practising outshots, repeat the procedure.  For actual practise I like to break my 61-100+ outshots down into blocks of 10 and focus on 2 blocks per month, and I do 3-60 almost every practise.  I give myself 3 darts at the outs under 60 or 6 darts at 61-100.  I also spend time doing 121+ or 170 in 9 darts, of course your method may vary.

For thinking about outshots I'll roll a bunch of random ones in my head while I e.g.., walk to work (taking 2 digits off a car number plate is a great random number generator) and go through them.  If it's 64, for example, I'll go through what I would do with 3 darts in hand (48-16), with 2 darts in hand (14-Bull or 42-22) or if I miss either side into the single (8-16-40 or 7-17-40) or into the treble (24-40 or 21-19/3-24/40).  It took me a long time at first but now it's fairly effortless. Wink  What also helped me with the math was thinking about the segments as numbers, so T14 is 42, D12 is 24 etc.

Also think about what you leave if/when you don't hit the setup treble that you are looking for.  It is very easy to get hung up on trying to leave a "favourite double" which is why I don't have one.  An example is 80.  If your favourite double is D16, you'll be likely to go 48-32.  IMO the better option is 60-20 because a single 20 still leaves you a single-double combination (20-40) as opposed to leaving you with a treble-double or single-Bull combination with a single 16.
Reply
With all the apps and scoring aids nowadays, this thread is still perfectly valid.  Like "free" offers on the internet, beware of darting shortcuts. Wink
Reply
I've been doing outs for about a month now, so what do I know.

But I think use of such tables would be a waste because a) my memory has always been pants, b) it teaches over-reliance on a fixed table and thus a fixed way of doing things, c) related to b, it harms and conflicts with your ability to do things your own way and be flexible with your outs.

I would say the best way to learn outs is to practice them from 170 to 41, and working things out on the fly for yourself. After a while, this becomes ingrained as you find your own methods and shortcuts.
Reply
Without a doubt, but the thread is not just about using tables.  May have started that way - lol.  Having said that, tables can establish a baseline until you figure out the best route for you.  Which takes board time...
Reply
D) All of the above
Levonster  Out! 
Reply
(08-17-2019, 04:36 PM)Jefferz Wrote: I've been doing outs for about a month now, so what do I know.

But I think use of such tables would be a waste because a) my memory has always been pants, b) it teaches over-reliance on a fixed table and thus a fixed way of doing things, c) related to b, it harms and conflicts with your ability to do things your own way and be flexible with your outs.

I would say the best way to learn outs is to practice them from 170 to 41, and working things out on the fly for yourself. After a while, this becomes ingrained as you find your own methods and shortcuts.

This is kind of the thing I wrote in one of my previous posts above. I mentioned a player who had told me the same, that he didn't want to learn some stupid outs from charts because he liked to do it his own way. Read: he wasn't able to learn and understand the simple logic of most routes and he preferred his own better ways - llike 99 = T20, 9, D15. He was simply only able to count to the nearest ten of the out. Of course, once out of ten attempts he hit that which was unbreakable evidence that he was right...

There's one other thing which is very important for learning outs. You always have to count and know what your score is. I mean, if you have 112 and you plan to start with T20, you have to immediately know what your score is after the first dart is thrown. Example, if you hit T5 instead, you have to know that your score is 97 now. I see very often players throwing the second dart at T20 again and only after that they start to count what they had hit and what their score is now. Which is bad thinking that costs them at least one dart if they hit that T20.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  nightcrawler variations checkout table nightcrawler 19 3,438 06-25-2018, 01:48 AM
Last Post: Callum8711
  Darts Checkout Assistant HeBeGB 4 704 03-16-2018, 07:01 PM
Last Post: SparkVendetta
Video Any faults in my throw? (also 150 checkout fail lol) Liam Twigg 5 912 03-14-2018, 08:25 PM
Last Post: Crusher17



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)