Darts - Beginners 3 things you must do to become a good Player
(10-28-2015, 04:11 PM)nivla Wrote:
(10-28-2015, 06:14 AM)MrManWest Wrote: practice makes perfect Big Grin

you said it man...nice Smile

Practice makes permanent.  

Perfect practice makes perfect.
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1) Passion
2) Persistence
3) Practice good technique
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Darts: 22g Rebel One80 / 22g John Part Golden Hero
Stems: Harrow Magnetic Mediums
Flights: Combat
Board: Blade 4
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Highest checkout: 167
Favorite checkout: 125 (50-25-50)
Fave players: Anderson, Wright, Part
Fave double: D16
Fave double in: D20
Best Game: 9 Dart 501

Best Darting Moments: playing John Part at an Exhibition / Being in attendance at World Grand Prix in Dublin 2014
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Lots of great pointers here for sure.
For those not extending your arm fully I once again suggest throwing at D20 for awhile, this helps you extend that arm and at the same time become good at the D20.

Larry
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(10-28-2015, 06:35 PM)*Saber* Wrote: Lots of great pointers here for sure.
For those not extending your arm fully I once again suggest throwing at D20 for awhile, this helps you extend that arm and at the same time become good at the D20.

Larry

To extend your arm, I suggested turning your targetting systems off.

I would practice from closer than the oche to throw at the board with complete extension.  Target is irrelevant.  You start closer because you don't want to miss the board.  As you get the idea that the dart will hit the board, move further back.  Targetting is still irrelevant. Move back until you are at the oche again.  DO NOT AIM at anything beyond the board.

If you are doing Flight School, now is the time to integrate A2 practice.  Get all the darts to land in the same area.  ie, repeat the stroke over and over again.  NO TARGETTING.  Once you get good at this, introduce a target.

I will be dollars to donuts that this will cause an immediate reversion to the old style, especially if the player starts spot shooting.  Introduce the target by AREA.  eg. center of the board.  Around the T12, Around the T15, Around the D7 etc, etc... success is defined by maintaining the extended stroke, NOT HITTING THE TARGET!  If you hit it, chalk it up to luck and smile.  Keep stroking into these areas, and be patient.... the grouping will begin to coalesce around your target, without strain or force as you continue to extend the stroke.  DO NOT WORRY ABOUT MISSING! 

That is the last thing on your mind.  Once you have a group that is within two flight widths in diameter, add the A1 drill.

The whole idea here is that you want consistency first.  Anyone can fluke a dart into the T20 from time to time.  Few can group tight enough to hit a 180 regularly.  The grouping comes first.

Consistency is based on consistency of movement, not consistency of result.  The result in the dartboard says NOTHING about how you threw the darts.  

Do not confuse hitting your target with throwing well.  

As you throw learn to throw better, the results will come.
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nicely said...this are all good stuff... Big Grin
RebelModdarts: Tongue darts for life..! :stressed:
Darts: unicorn blackstar 22 grms carbon shaft Robson plus flights
Board: Terton Craft Samurai
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1. Punch above your weight
2. Remember that every time you skip practice, your next opponent is using that time to get better than you.
3. Forgive everything.
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Thanks for all the great advice. I can't wait, only 4 four more posts to go until I can get the rest!
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May have only played a year but hey ho, here's my 3 tips.

1) Don't think, do. Thinking "I'm doing well here" or thinking about hitting 180s usually ends in disaster.
2) Know when to set up. An outshot is only worth going for if you think you can do it. No confidence = reduced chance of success.
3) Don't be disheartened by off days. We all have them, and if you keep at it you'll come back stronger.
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"And the devil did grin; for his darling sin is pride that apes humility." - Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Current setup:

Cosmo Juggler Queen 2nd 400 (18g) + One80 Reflex conversion points
Cosmo Carbon #8 locked stem
Cosmo Fit Flight Juggler yellow (ocean design)

High checkout: 124 (T20, T14, D11, steeltip)
Best 501 leg: 20 darts
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My 3 Tips

1. Play the game
2. Play the game
3. Last but not least Play the game
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(12-19-2015, 06:11 PM)Crusher17 Wrote: My 3 Tips

1. Play the game
2. Play the game
3. Last but not least Play the game
Awwwww brilliant Tongue
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I like to think there are three parts to the game: technique, mental game, strategy.

So, the three things could be:

1) Improve your technique ( mechanics )
2) Improve your mental game ( develop confidence, learn to manage pressure )
3) Improve your strategy ( learn your outs )

You can improve technique and develop confidence at practice.  

It is ok to think about your technique during technique practice.   I mean if you want to learn to follow through, it's fine to think about it, and be very conscious about it.   

A beginner can develop confidence and technique with the Flight School A1 drill -- you can choose first  to think about the throw, then slowly think less and less about throwing, and more about the target.   Some of what you worked on when thinking about ought to simply transfer over.

When you get to a game situation, you don't want to be thinking about technique.  You want to be having fun and not thinking about how to throw.  That happens more as you develop confidence -- so practicing drills that have scoring behind them is important.  Not just throwing at the T20.   

To learn your outs, start with the little ones.  Below 40 first.  Then as the comfort level with the game improves, 40-60, 60-80, 80-100 and beyond..... And of course, since you are trying to get to zero, you always need to know what you have left, so improving your counting skills is a really good idea.  You can do this as you throw by subtracting each dart from your score.  You can do this when you watch darts, add up the darts and subtract before they show you the scores on TV.
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(12-19-2015, 08:12 PM)BigE Wrote: I like to think there are three parts to the game: technique, mental game, strategy.

So, the three things could be:

1) Improve your technique ( mechanics )
2) Improve your mental game ( develop confidence, learn to manage pressure )
3) Improve your strategy ( learn your outs )
 
... 

To learn your outs, start with the little ones.  Below 40 first.  Then as the comfort level with the game improves, 40-60, 60-80, 80-100 and beyond..... And of course, since you are trying to get to zero, you always need to know what you have left, so improving your counting skills is a really good idea.  You can do this as you throw by subtracting each dart from your score.  You can do this when you watch darts, add up the darts and subtract before they show you the scores on TV.

It's interesting, having come from archery (a while ago) the first two points are identical. Darts, however, has the added mathematical dimension that seems to have the a secondary effect of playing with your mental game; knowing your outs means knowing exactly what you need to win or lose not just in the moment but a number of darts ahead. Makes it feel akin, in some respects, to poker or chess.
Beginning to hit the board.

Flight School newbie.
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(12-29-2015, 07:47 AM)Aarleks Wrote:
(12-19-2015, 08:12 PM)BigE Wrote: I like to think there are three parts to the game: technique, mental game, strategy.

So, the three things could be:

1) Improve your technique ( mechanics )
2) Improve your mental game ( develop confidence, learn to manage pressure )
3) Improve your strategy ( learn your outs )
 
... 

To learn your outs, start with the little ones.  Below 40 first.  Then as the comfort level with the game improves, 40-60, 60-80, 80-100 and beyond..... And of course, since you are trying to get to zero, you always need to know what you have left, so improving your counting skills is a really good idea.  You can do this as you throw by subtracting each dart from your score.  You can do this when you watch darts, add up the darts and subtract before they show you the scores on TV.

It's interesting, having come from archery (a while ago) the first two points are identical. Darts, however, has the added mathematical dimension that seems to have the a secondary effect of playing with your mental game; knowing your outs means knowing exactly what you need to win or lose not just in the moment but a number of darts ahead. Makes it feel akin, in some respects, to poker or chess.

Insomnia strikes again....

All I know about archery is  that the target is the same every time,.  And that could be wrong too.  But yes, knowing your outs and your setup shots is a very important component to the game.  It *does* affect your mental game, in that when you are learning those things, they can be a huge distraction.   Especially when there is a blocked number in your preferred setup sequence, and you need to improvise a solution, or you simply miss a shot.  That can lead to very poor scores if it interrupts your flow.

I was once instructed to mentally subtract every shot starting around 300.  The idea being that identifying where you are without strain or stress can help make your shot selection more automatic.  The number 300 was chosen as most higher numbers don't matter until you're a pro.  Anyway, until you do incorporate that subtraction into your game, you may find your game dropping off. OTOH, if you are overthinking your shots, that distraction might help.  

MvG and  Lewis  can change shot selection on a missed dart without  breaking rhythm -- their change in plans looks natural.

I can't imagine that the pros  learned to do this just by playing.  I'd think some memorization of what to do given the number of darts in hand and how close your opponent is to a finish is necessary.  OTOH,  I don't see the average player taking the time to deal with this level of detail.  Rather, the "struggle as the finish line nears" is more common -- the usual reaction is to just keep pounding away at big scores until you think you can finish.  

That can work too, though simple changes here can help a great deal -- like incorporating a shot at bull on the last dart to get below 100 to leave a two dart out instead of a three dart out.  eg. 161 is T20, T17, Bull.  But if you miss T20 into the 20? you continue on 141 with another T20.  You miss an have now thrown 20-20. With another shot at the T20, you risk leaving 101.  With a shot at bull, you're thinking 96 ( or 71 ) is better.  That 25 saves you a dart.  It is a simple and effective strategy.  

Now, what if your opponent is far away from a finish, say 200, and you hit T20 T17.... you can now set up your favourite double instead of taking a swing at the Bull.  If that double is D20, taking a swing at the bull and missing means there is a HUGE chance that you won't be shooting for D20 on your next turn.  You might hit 25, or anything from 11-20, making a mess of your finish which costs you darts and puts you at a disadvantage.  It's a simple strategy that again, saves you darts.
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Solo practice.
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Thanks for all the pointers group.
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