Pro Players practice to use same setup?
Hi,

I just read this guide, which is fairly nice and useful http://www.dartsnutz.net/forum/showthread.php?tid=1500 but I noticed something interesting.

In this guide is written following:

"Throw your dart at your natural pace"

"its more important to throw natural rather than force yourself to correct it (the barrel shape will do this for you)."

"We have to find out the right barrel shape for an individuals throw, dart barrel shapes are designed to correct the throwers mistakes."

So while watching the pros play darts, you see like 98% of them use a straight barrel with a medium or intermediate stem (rarely see short stems) and they are all using same shape of flight (almost) and same design of straight barrel.

Do they "force" themselves to use this kind of setup, because it's the best and most forgiving, and then because they are pros, they practice a lot so they can play with this kind or setup?

All their darts are so much the same, so you think that they don't use what's good for them and their throw.

You rarely see front loaded barrels or anything like that. It's all straight barrel etc. The only one that comes to my mind of different darts is Phil Taylor who use a more fat and short barrel, but he is close to be the only one, at least out of the well known players.

Anyone with an explanation of why all the players darts are so close to each other.

Thanks Smile

I'm looking forward to using this great forum!
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Interesting .........

In 'the old days' far more players seem to have used ' fat and short barrel darts' as you describe them.
Fordham, Lowe, Manley, Taylor and Rees come to mind as 'bomb-type' dart users and Priestley, Hankey and others used ones that were 'front loaded'.

From the same era in golf......... it was normal to see a whole range of weird and wonderful swings and some pretty idiosyncratic club selection as well. Now - thanks mainly I guess to the explosion in college scholarships and intensive national coaching - the vast majority of players look like 'clones' with technically perfect mechanics. The same has happened in archery since the Koreans started to coach their national squad technique based on bio-mechanical principles with world beating results!

Not sure that 'coaching' plays much of a role in darts (?) but I guess lots of new players imitate what they see on the TV and buy their hero's darts?
Personally, I think its great that we still have quite a bit of individual 'style' in darts................ it was fun at the weekend to watch Barney, Anderson, MVG and Suljovic all with very individual but effective throws.

I have a whole range of barrel shapes and I'm still trying to find out what works for me Angry
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I think you are right with the new upcoming players who try to imitate their idols because that way of throw or swing is popular right now.

Weird why older players used a fat dart or a bomber-type dart? Maybe because they grew up with fat brass darts?

Just funny to see, how all the new younger players today are using the same design of barrel, straight barrel and standard flight.

I think I have to try to buy some intermediate stems together with a 50 mm long barrel.
Reply
(01-31-2018, 01:58 AM)Mike Garbett Wrote: Interesting .........

In 'the old days' far more players seem to have used ' fat and short barrel darts' as you describe them.
Fordham, Lowe, Manley, Taylor and Rees come to mind as 'bomb-type' dart users and Priestley, Hankey and others used ones that were 'front loaded'.

From the same era in golf......... it was normal to see a whole range of weird and wonderful swings and some pretty idiosyncratic club selection as well. Now - thanks mainly I guess to the explosion in college scholarships and intensive national coaching - the vast majority of players look like 'clones' with technically perfect mechanics. The same has happened in archery since the Koreans started to coach their national squad technique based on bio-mechanical principles with world beating results!

Not sure that 'coaching' plays much of a role in darts (?) but I guess lots of new players imitate what they see on the TV and buy their hero's darts?
Personally, I think its great that we still have quite a bit of individual 'style' in darts................ it was fun at the weekend to watch Barney, Anderson, MVG and Suljovic all with very individual but effective throws.

I have a whole range of barrel shapes and I'm still trying to find out what works for me Angry

In basketball it is said that with good shooting mechanics, it's easier and faster to become a good jumpshooter than by having bad mechanics and I think that it's exactly the same in darts or golf.

Yes, you can become a great darts player even with bad mechanics but you're going need much more repetitions and than by having picture-perfect mechanics.
Reply
I think firstly how you naturally grip the dart effects barrel choice
Then yes probably we all better served by getting basic techniques right such as follow through. NO head movement etc but once you add in speed of your throw ,grip of dart as said and your own height in relation to board then these things do effect the whole process
Then through in the odd natural talent who does it their own way ie bristow,Taylor, jockie, rvb etc or in ny sport ... Sullivan in snooker,woods at golf usain bolt the sprinter..... way to tall for a sprinter at 6 5
then it just shows we re ll different , different likes,skills amount we practice the most important this is we all love the sport of darts !!!
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I'm sure that you are correct about good mechanics always being better than poor BUT....... I think the real problems kick in when the 'ideal bio-mechanical method' is applied without any appreciation of the individual student's physical makeup. I see this in archery where club coaches try to pass on what they have read or seen demonstrated by world class coaches working with world class archers who have been selected because of their 'ideal physique'. Ordinary mortals with less than ideal physiques have no hope of emulating their Olympic heroes and either get frustrated or injured - or both!

In darts, I cannot move my forearm into a vertical position................ a 15 degree slope from the elbow in towards the wrist is the best I can do. I'm not 'deformed' or injured............... its just the way my shoulder is constructed. For a long time I struggled to get it as close to vertical as I could by leaning my body etc. but all I got for my trouble was pain and frustration. Once I stopped worrying about it and just let my natural throw develop......... things got much better. I still work on consistency, a really smoooooooth action and a good follow through (the elements of good mechanics that I can cope with) but just accept that the vertical forearm - which would make horizontal accuracy much easier - just ain't going to happen for me.
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(01-31-2018, 09:35 PM)Koivu Wrote: In basketball it is said that with good shooting mechanics, it's easier and faster to become a good jumpshooter than by having bad mechanics and I think that it's exactly the same in darts or golf.

Yes, you can become a great darts player even with bad mechanics but you're going need much more repetitions and than by having picture-perfect mechanics.

What constitutes "picture perfect mechanics" in darts?

I see the "99% of pros don't use short stems" bit has been suitably corrected in another thread also.... Tongue
Reply
(02-01-2018, 04:54 PM)wongerchi Wrote:
(01-31-2018, 09:35 PM)Koivu Wrote: In basketball it is said that with good shooting mechanics, it's easier and faster to become a good jumpshooter than by having bad mechanics and I think that it's exactly the same in darts or golf.

Yes, you can become a great darts player even with bad mechanics but you're going need much more repetitions and than by having picture-perfect mechanics.

What constitutes "picture perfect mechanics" in darts?

I see the "99% of pros don't use short stems" bit has been suitably corrected in another thread also....  Tongue
Something closer to Steve Beaton's throw than Benito van de Pas's throw  Tongue
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I think trying to apply picture perfect mechanics to darts, is doing the human brain a disservice.
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(01-30-2018, 09:46 PM)cpohd Wrote: Hi,

I just read this guide, which is fairly nice and useful http://www.dartsnutz.net/forum/showthread.php?tid=1500 but I noticed something interesting.

In this guide is written following:

"Throw your dart at your natural pace"

"its more important to throw natural rather than force yourself to correct it (the barrel shape will do this for you)."

"We have to find out the right barrel shape for an individuals throw, dart barrel shapes are designed to correct the throwers mistakes."

So while watching the pros play darts, you see like 98% of them use a straight barrel with a medium or intermediate stem (rarely see short stems) and they are all using same shape of flight (almost) and same design of straight barrel.

Do they "force" themselves to use this kind of setup, because it's the best and most forgiving, and then because they are pros, they practice a lot so they can play with this kind or setup?

All their darts are so much the same, so you think that they don't use what's good for them and their throw.

You rarely see front loaded barrels or anything like that. It's all straight barrel etc. The only one that comes to my mind of different darts is Phil Taylor who use a more fat and short barrel, but he is close to be the only one, at least out of the well known players.

Anyone with an explanation of why all the players darts are so close to each other.

Thanks Smile

I'm looking forward to using this great forum!

I agree with a lot of what you say, although many top pros use short stems. Lewis, mvg, Wade, king, and Cullen to name just 5
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