aiming and throwing round the board
since I am still a novice and I am constructing my throw, I was wondering if I am doing the following right:

most times (when I'm trowing at anything other then t20) I would get ready to throw like if I was going for treble 20 (most of my darts have been thrown into this bed - thats where I feel most comfortable). then I would move my upper body - keeping fixed my arm, shoulder, head, everything (moving just from my waist - twisting left or right and tilting up or down) in order to keep whole aiming/throwing apparatus always fixed. hope you understand what I mean..

I know I look weird to some people when they see me aiming at 60 and then performing robot-like movement to aim at desired target (say D16) but I am just not confident about my throw otherwise.
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I guess my question is really stupid! sorry for that. Undecided
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Sounds good. My suggestion would be to focus on the target and especially on the follow through. It is all in muscle memory and keeping fluid.
[Image: aOjMFD3.jpg]
Medicine Hat Darts League---------------------------------                  Darts Used: 22g One80 R2 Renegade's
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I don't think that too many questions asked are stupid, but some responses may be. Leaky says to focus and I have to agree. Whatever it takes. You want to play robo-dart then do it. LOL
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If you find it works for you then that's all that matters.
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I suggest the longer you play, the less robotic those movements will become and it will be like second nature to adjust your upper body to your target if that is what you so desire without it being as noticeable.

I watch a lot of the pro players and when the camera is on Phil Taylor and he's throwing at the 20 bed his first 2 darts and then decides to go for the T-19 as a cover shot, I can tell he's going there just by looking in his eyes as he shifts his gaze downward. He doesn't seem to be adjusting his body in any way, but his eyes definitely fix on his intended target.

Everybody has their way of adjusting to various targets. I see a lot of folks that slide along the oche depending on what side of the board they are throwing on, whether it's a D-16 or D-10.
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As a new player it is important to remember, follow through every dart. Apart from that develop a comfortable, repeatable throw that works for you.
Many years ago my snooker coach Vic Harris ( English Champion ) asked me what I thought important to become a better player so I replied, no head movement, follow through and a smooth stroke.
He replied well yes they all help but the test of a good action is if you can pot the ball's when your arse is hanging out. If you can do that you have a good cue action. I believe the same can be said of throwing darts so I will take effectiveness over style every day
[Image: GEpKdcf.png] 
Current Board 
ONE80 Gladiator 3 with Corona Surround and Unicorn number ring
Darts
Modified Unicorn Striker with RD medium sparkle stems, hardcore  charcoal flights and Target titanium stem rings   

Playing 40 years on and off and still barely average
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Cheers guys, that was helpfull.

When I started darts chapter of my life, I felt really uncomfortable with my grip. So I decided to throw 10s of thousends of darts keeping focus on the follow through and stance, hoping that grip will eventually evolve.

It kinda did and I am happy with the way my darts are flying now. I am also slightly proud on my zen-esque approuch to darts. Smile Imagine doing something really badly for month after month..

One thing I only just found out is that it seems to me that all imperfections in my throwing action are magnified if I use medium stems (as opposed to using short ones). I like that, and I think I'll stick with longer stems and polish my throw..
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You may find that this robotic approach works well in the short term. For the long term, I would be looking at a stance that allows you to maintain balance when addressing all targets.

For example, let's assume that when you are shooting T20, you're balanced nicely atop the stance foot. You're not leaning in, but stance is comfortable. Leaning in will get you a little closer to the board, but it will also give you more problems with balance, especially as the arm moves away from the body.

Thinking this way, if you are well balanced ( meaning there is little effort made to stand up ) and then break a the hip/waist to address a number lower on the board, you are - by definition - no longer well balanced; the effort to stay atop the stance foot increases. That compromises your ability to reliably deliver the dart to the board.

Also, think about this.... if you are off by a degree in your tilt, you're going to miss a LOT. The problem with moving the big mass at the oche side of the shoulder, is that small changes here result in HUGE changes at the board.

As far as I would go is twisting the upper body from side to side. I think this might be why some right handed people line up on the far right.... they limit the rotation to their strong side. There is no turning to the weak/outer side. The penalty, is that the T20, T19 and all left side of the board is further away... and the angle of entry of the dart makes left side doubles smaller.

looking at Barney, he noticeably relaxes the hips and the pelvis moves forwards.... he has a stable and steady platform from which he shoots.

Yes, it is going to be more difficult to find the numbers you want, but there are huge benefits in doing so, especially if you are a rhythm shooter at the 20. Imagine needing to robotically address each target as you take out say 93. T19 is the shot, miss into the 19. 74 is the shot, robotically address the T14... Hit T14. Robotically address the D16....

There is no flow to this process.

One way of dealing with addressing these different places on the board is to hang a string in front of the board. At first down the middle of the twenty. Your elbow and the string define a plane. The hand moves forward in that plane. Now shoot at D20 alternating with D3. The only change I suggest would be in the height of the elbow.

Move the string so that it falls down D11. Once again, elbow at the string, hand moving in plane defined by string and elbow..... Same with D6. Try through T18 and T2, T12 and T7... Rotation of the upper body means you should still be balanced easily. Lift/lowering of the elbow and you should remain balanced.

In all cases, the follow through extends to the target.
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Thanks BigE for your insightful thoughts.

I'll definitely give string a go and try to limit upper body movement to twisting. And I will also try to watch pros and see how they do it.

Love this game! Smile
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Agree with Gumbo on this one too - don't move any part of your body that doesn't need to move. I got corrected in the same way, used to stand dead centre of the board and if i was on D10 or D16 I'd move left or right to accommodate it. I now stand slightly left (being a left hander) and move my upper body (turning from the waist) to throw at either side of the board and it's helped my game immensely
Twitter - @OH_THAT_DAVE

Instagram - @OH_THAT_DAVE
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As for Chris' advice, don't throw darts with your arse hanging out, liable to get thrown out of most places lol
Twitter - @OH_THAT_DAVE

Instagram - @OH_THAT_DAVE
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PMSL, you know I meant that if you can hit your target when it means everything your throw is PERFECT! LOL
[Image: GEpKdcf.png] 
Current Board 
ONE80 Gladiator 3 with Corona Surround and Unicorn number ring
Darts
Modified Unicorn Striker with RD medium sparkle stems, hardcore  charcoal flights and Target titanium stem rings   

Playing 40 years on and off and still barely average
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Mine is goosed then, probably coz my arse is hanging out and I keep getting thrown out of places Smile
Twitter - @OH_THAT_DAVE

Instagram - @OH_THAT_DAVE
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As a developing player, the stance simply ought to be well balanced, easy to do. You'll be in this position many many hours as you play more. Make it comfortable.

At this point, the most important component is to follow through on each and every dart.

Make practicing this a conscious effort until it is automatic. That will take a *very* long time. Think in terms of months and years, not weeks.

When you get caught up in the moment during competition, you'll want to be sure that the arm is going out on each dart. This should be the last of your concerns when you play a game.
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