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that came from my set of winmau graffiti darts. i know harrows has a similar stuff. my question is that. what is the best way to memorize this table? also, if u guys don’t really need that kinda table. how can u guys calculate what number that needed to be hitted so quickly? 
[Image: 5C5E5494-C421-4042-B9DB-13568937485D.jpg]
The only way I know to memorize this chart is to play so much that it's second nature.
I'm horrible at numbers and it takes me longer to do the math so, be patient when we play.
right.
here comes my follow up question. there should be tons of combinations out there. why should we follow that table?
Easiest way to learn is to work at it, keep score without apps, learn that after shooting your 1st dart that you can still go out with the remaining 2 darts, like if you go 20's on 122 if you hit a single 20 you can''t go out in 2 darts, if you go 18's on 122 if you hit a single 18 you can still go out on 104
Have a look at this book . . . .

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Darts-Finishing...ng+mastery

It clearly explains all the options for checkouts, & why certain ways give a better chance of success than others.

It makes it so much easier to remember the checkouts when you understand the logic of why & when to go a particular route.

[Image: book-finishing_400x400_zpsgqignigm.jpg]
(04-24-2018, 05:04 AM)1double1 Wrote: [ -> ]right.
here comes my follow up question. there should be tons of combinations out there. why should we follow that table?

You can't break the rules until you know how to play the game...

There were two new local players at our tournaments, We discussed this topic of following checkout tables. One of the new players was refusing these "stupid" cards because he had his own (and better, of course) routes how to finish legs. The other player kept my advice, learnt the outs (it's easier than it seems to be at the first glance) and he knew soon what to do and why. The first player eventually learnt the proper routes too. Thing is, it took him much longer to accept the fact that it's really easier when you follow routes that in most cases end up on D16, D20 or D12.
(04-24-2018, 06:50 AM)Mindyereyes Wrote: [ -> ]It makes it so much easier to remember the checkouts when you understand the logic of why & when to go a particular route.

This!!!!!!
thanks for the recommendation mindyereyes!
and guys, i didn’t say that table was stupid. i know there must be a reason behind it and that’s why i asked. Smile
just wanna share a little bit more about my story. when i was young. i saw mr. eric bristow playing dart on tv. eric was great of course. but what i really felt amazing was in fact the cameraman. after eric threw the first dart in the middle of his game. the cameraman then suddenly zoom in a particular number and sector. i said darn! how does he know where eric gonna throw!? lol.......
Of course the best way to memorize is to play those numbers.
One of the first things I learn when i started playing darts was the finishing routes. I find that this is the easiest thing in darts (but it was easier for me because beeing a physicist made me good with numbers)

My personal advice is this.
You have to understand that despite the fact that all the doubles are the same size, the prefered doubles are mainly D20, D16, D8, D18 and D12. So when you have a chechout below 100 you have to think which treble will leave you the prefered double.
I learn those routes while driving my car, sitting in the bus or waiting in a bank line. 
Just take it from the beggining and think: If i have 3 left what should i do? 1, D1.
If i have 5 left? 1, D2 ...... and so on until the 170. When you can answer to the what should i do question, without thinking you are ready.

Advice 2: Always think what the missing treble is leaving you and be prepared to answer to yourself the what should i do question
129? what should i do? t20 19 BULL? if i miss the first treble? 109 left is not chachable with two darts? is there any way to have more chances? What if i go for t19 first? If i miss the first treble it leaves me 110 - T20 BULL.

So take it step by step. It cannot be like the history lesson in school that you have to memorize. It should be understaning and learning.
Fist the small numbers and then all the others.

Sorry for my long answer

Do not memorize  - LEARN
(04-24-2018, 06:50 AM)Mindyereyes Wrote: [ -> ]It makes it so much easier to remember the checkouts when you understand the logic of why & when to go a particular route.

second this!
The best way how to learn outs is to practice these outs. I'd recommend practicing games like Catch 40 or finishing 170 in 9 or 12 or whatever number of darts you want. If you have some apps with similar games like this then use it, if you don't, look at my sig and download some of my own excels. You can find the Catch 40 game in my Darts Decider, or you can find some other games in the 170 in 9 darts and other routines spreadsheet.

Mind that the basics is to know outs from 100 down. If you know how to finish 83, then you would know how to finish a score 143 either because it's just 83 + 60 etc. (there are exceptions though...). Also, I've been playing darts for 20 years, I have finished every possible checkout at least once, and I know the whole logic of it, however even now I am open to new ideas how to finish certain scores. E.g. I have finished 152 numerous times with T20, T20, D16 and then I see someone else to finish it with T19, T19, D19 and it's moments like this when you realise there is a lot more nice ways how to finish legs even though it's more risky.

Talking about number of ways how to finish the leg, have you ever think of how many ways there is just for hitting a 9 darter? Don't even try to count it :-) You better google it. You might be surprised.

Anyway, if you know all pros and cons of every route then it's up to you if you choose some unusual ones now and then. For a starter I'd follow the tables like the one by Richard Ashdown.
(04-24-2018, 11:11 AM)copigme Wrote: [ -> ]Of course the best way to memorize is to play those numbers.
One of the first things I learn when i started playing darts was the finishing routes. I find that this is the easiest thing in darts (but it was easier for me because beeing a physicist made me good with numbers)

My personal advice is this.
You have to understand that despite the fact that all the doubles are the same size, the prefered doubles are mainly D20, D16, D8, D18 and D12. So when you have a chechout below 100 you have to think which treble will leave you the prefered double.
I learn those routes while driving my car, sitting in the bus or waiting in a bank line. 
Just take it from the beggining and think: If i have 3 left what should i do? 1, D1.
If i have 5 left? 1, D2 ...... and so on until the 170. When you can answer to the what should i do question, without thinking you are ready.

Advice 2: Always think what the missing treble is leaving you and be prepared to answer to yourself the what should i do question
129? what should i do? t20 19 BULL? if i miss the first treble? 109 left is not chachable with two darts? is there any way to have more chances? What if i go for t19 first? If i miss the first treble it leaves me 110 - T20 BULL.

So take it step by step. It cannot be like the history lesson in school that you have to memorize. It should be understaning and learning.
Fist the small numbers and then all the others.

Sorry for my long answer

Do not memorize  - LEARN
those are some very useful tips. thanks very much for sharing. i totally agree with you. learning is the way to go.
(04-24-2018, 03:30 PM)1double1 Wrote: [ -> ]those are some very useful tips. thanks very much for sharing. i totally agree with you. learning is the way to go.

It is, absolutely.  But you don't need to learn ALL the outshots.  You only need to learn 3-100 and you know them all up to 170.  Why?  Because the higher outshots only (!) require you to hit a treble to get down to a 2-dart out, and guess what - the 2 dart outs are all between 3 and 100. I would also suggest that you pay particular attention to the #s where the routes change when you have 2 or 3 darts in hand.  However, if you're just starting I would not concern yourself with the correct way to go on outs such as 122 or 127 etc just yet, the reasoning behind them will become obvious once you get the 2 dart outs figured out.

As everyone on the forum knows by now my attitude towards outshots is practise, practise, thinking, practise, think some more, practise. Blush   And when you think you've done enough thinking and practising outshots, repeat the procedure.  For actual practise I like to break my 61-100+ outshots down into blocks of 10 and focus on 2 blocks per month, and I do 3-60 almost every practise.  I give myself 3 darts at the outs under 60 or 6 darts at 61-100.  I also spend time doing 121+ or 170 in 9 darts, of course your method may vary.

For thinking about outshots I'll roll a bunch of random ones in my head while I e.g.., walk to work (taking 2 digits off a car number plate is a great random number generator) and go through them.  If it's 64, for example, I'll go through what I would do with 3 darts in hand (48-16), with 2 darts in hand (14-Bull or 42-22) or if I miss either side into the single (8-16-40 or 7-17-40) or into the treble (24-40 or 21-19/3-24/40).  It took me a long time at first but now it's fairly effortless. Wink  What also helped me with the math was thinking about the segments as numbers, so T14 is 42, D12 is 24 etc.

Also think about what you leave if/when you don't hit the setup treble that you are looking for.  It is very easy to get hung up on trying to leave a "favourite double" which is why I don't have one.  An example is 80.  If your favourite double is D16, you'll be likely to go 48-32.  IMO the better option is 60-20 because a single 20 still leaves you a single-double combination (20-40) as opposed to leaving you with a treble-double or single-Bull combination with a single 16.
With all the apps and scoring aids nowadays, this thread is still perfectly valid.  Like "free" offers on the internet, beware of darting shortcuts. Wink
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